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  1. #1
    tm123 is offline Newbie
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    Default The sentence which is in a book is right or wrong?

    As simple as the equation may seem, it represents a theory so important that it changed science and physics completely.

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: The sentence which is in a book is right or wrong?

    Quote Originally Posted by tm123 View Post
    As simple as the equation may seem, it represents a theory so important that it changed science and physics completely.
    What's the problem? - apart from the obvious one that physics is part of science, which might make it a bit clearer thus: 'so important that it changed science completely - particularly physics'.

    b

  3. #3
    tm123 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: The sentence which is in a book is right or wrong?

    Thank you.
    But I don't understand the first "As". I think the right sentence is"Simple as the equation may seem, it represents a theory so important that it changed science and physics completely". Because my teacher tell me "as=though(used after an adj or adv to introduce a clause of concession)" For example:Young as I am,I already know a lot of things.

  4. #4
    tm123 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: The sentence which is in a book is right or wrong?

    I can't understand the hyperbatic sentence.
    Can you change it ?
    I hope it is not a hyperbatic sentence.

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: The sentence which is in a book is right or wrong?

    Quote Originally Posted by tm123 View Post
    Thank you.
    But I don't understand the first "As". I think the right sentence is"Simple as the equation may seem, it represents a theory so important that it changed science and physics completely". Because my teacher tell me "as=though(used after an adj or adv to introduce a clause of concession)" For example:Young as I am,I already know a lot of things.
    Yes - 'Although the equation may seem simple...' or 'In spite of the equation's apparent simplicity...'.

    b

  6. #6
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The sentence which is in a book is right or wrong?

    Quote Originally Posted by tm123 View Post
    I can't understand the hyperbatic sentence.
    Can you change it ?
    I hope it is not a hyperbatic sentence.
    I don't consider it to be hyperbatic. What makes you think it is?

  7. #7
    tm123 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: The sentence which is in a book is right or wrong?

    Hyperbatic \Hy`per*bat"ic\, a.
    Of or pertaining to an hyperbaton; transposed; inverted.

    From Wikipedia

    Hyperbaton is a figure of speech that uses deliberate and dramatic departure from standard syntax (word order) for emphasis or poetic effect. This term is sometimes used as a synonym for anastrophe, but is more properly used as a general term for figures of disorder, of which anastrophe, parenthesis, and apposition are more specific types.

    Derived from the Greek hyper ("over") and bainein ("to step"), with the tos/ton verbal adjective suffix.

    Examples:

    Word order reversal in "Cheese I love!"
    One of the most popular examples - "Size matters not! Judge me by my size, do you?" - Yoda in "The Empire Strikes Back"

  8. #8
    tm123 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: The sentence which is in a book is right or wrong?

    "As simple as the equation may seem, it represents a theory so important that it changed science and physics completely."

    I have looked at the sentence, and the comments that have followed. Personally, I do not see why people should have a problem with this sentence. To me, it seems perfectly straight forward.

    <<<As simple as the equation may seem>>>

    In other words:

    Although the equation seems simple

    The 'As', is not absolutely necessary, the sentence would still be perfectly acceptable in this form:

    <<<Simple as the equation may seem>>>

    The equation seems simple.

    There really is no problem here. This word for inverted sentence structure, hyperbatic, is rather odd.

    A similar word, which is much more common is 'hyperbaric', and it refers to special treatments where a person is subjected to atmospheric pressure, many times normal atmospheric pressure.

    Divers who come up too quickly, would normally suffer from the bends. One way round this problem is to place them in a hyperbaric chamber.

  9. #9
    tm123 is offline Newbie
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    Smile Re: The sentence which is in a book is right or wrong?

    A e-pal tell me about the words above.I share them with all of you.

  10. #10
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: The sentence which is in a book is right or wrong?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I don't consider it to be hyperbatic. What makes you think it is?
    Quote Originally Posted by tm123 View Post
    Hyperbatic \Hy`per*bat"ic\, a.
    Of or pertaining to an hyperbaton; transposed; inverted.
    From Wikipedia
    'Hyperbaton is a figure of speech that uses deliberate and dramatic departure from standard syntax (word order) for emphasis or poetic effect. This term is sometimes used as a synonym for anastrophe, but is more properly used as a general term for figures of disorder, of which anastrophe, parenthesis, and apposition are more specific types.
    Derived from the Greek hyper ("over") and bainein ("to step"), with the tos/ton verbal adjective suffix.
    Examples:
    Word order reversal in "Cheese I love!"
    One of the most popular examples - "Size matters not! Judge me by my size, do you?" - Yoda in "The Empire Strikes Back"
    Let me try to reconcile this apparent paradox. Mike is right - read the article:
    Hyperbaton is a figure of speech that uses deliberate and dramatic departure from standard syntax (word order) for emphasis or poetic effect.
    [my emphasis].

    You are confusing intention with a superficial effect. Yoda's speech is not hyperbatic; it is simply influenced - presumably - by an OSV grammar. He's not intending to produce 'emphasis or poetic effect'; that's just the way he talks.

    This is hyperbaton:

    I like meat; I quite like most vegetables; cheese, I love.

    b

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