Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    D3Rk is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Dutch
      • Home Country:
      • Netherlands
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like

    How to explain: Would you like to play / would you like playing

    Hi, I have got a question about the gerund, infintive and making an appointment. Our students are learned that they have to use a gerund (-ing form) after verbs such as 'to like'. Example: I like playing tennis.

    Now my questions are as follows.
    1. How can I easily explain what the difference is between 'I like playing tennis.' and 'I like to play tennis.'.
    2. If they have to make questions such as 'Would you like to go out with me?' and 'Would you like going out with me?', what would be the best way to explain this?

  2. #2
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    15,248
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: How to explain: Would you like to play / would you like playing

    Quote Originally Posted by D3Rk View Post
    Hi, I have got a question about the gerund, infintive and making an appointment. Our students are learned that they have to use a gerund (-ing form) after verbs such as 'to like'. Example: I like playing tennis.

    Now my questions are as follows.
    1. How can I easily explain what the difference is between 'I like playing tennis.' and 'I like to play tennis.'.
    2. If they have to make questions such as 'Would you like to go out with me?' and 'Would you like going out with me?', what would be the best way to explain this?
    The verb like can take either the gerund or the infinitive, usually with little to know difference in meaning. In some cases, the infinitive is a bit more theoretical than the gerund, but with eating ice cream or playing tennis, the difference is miniscule.

    In your second sentence the difference starts to express itself. With the "to form", the question makes more sense. How could someone know if they would like going out with someone unless they have already tried it? The infinitive form makes it more of a concept than an experience. In that same fashion, if two people are already dating, only the gerund form will work: Do you like going out with me?

  3. #3
    mmefauveau is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: How to explain: Would you like to play / would you like playing

    Hi,
    Here in France, kids are taught that after verbs that deal with tastes (love, hate, like, etc.) the following verbs automatically takes the gerund. We tell them they can find the infinitive but that they, as students, have to use the gerund.
    Now, it is not the same with WOULD LIKE because WOULD LIKE is NOT considered as a "taste verb" but a "will verb" (verbe de volonté, in French), just like WANT, EXPECT, ASK, ALLOW, FORBID, INVITE, ADVISE, etc. Sentences with those verbs are called "infinitive propositions" which means they are always built with TO ( Will verb + TO + Verb).

    Anyway, that's what we teach French kids, hope it helps.
    Regards,

  4. #4
    D3Rk is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Dutch
      • Home Country:
      • Netherlands
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: How to explain: Would you like to play / would you like playing

    Quote Originally Posted by mmefauveau View Post
    Hi,
    Here in France, kids are taught that after verbs that deal with tastes (love, hate, like, etc.) the following verbs automatically takes the gerund. We tell them they can find the infinitive but that they, as students, have to use the gerund.
    Now, it is not the same with WOULD LIKE because WOULD LIKE is NOT considered as a "taste verb" but a "will verb" (verbe de volonté, in French), just like WANT, EXPECT, ASK, ALLOW, FORBID, INVITE, ADVISE, etc. Sentences with those verbs are called "infinitive propositions" which means they are always built with TO ( Will verb + TO + Verb).

    Anyway, that's what we teach French kids, hope it helps.
    Regards,
    You have a point there. But the children do find it quite difficult to deal with these compound verbs. As soon as they see 'like' in a sentence, the automatically link it to the gerund.

    Nevertheless, thank you for the advise. It's of great help!

  5. #5
    Vkapankaj is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Post Re: How to explain: Would you like to play / would you like playing

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    The verb like can take either the gerund or the infinitive, usually with little to know difference in meaning. In some cases, the infinitive is a bit more theoretical than the gerund, but with eating ice cream or playing tennis, the difference is miniscule.

    In your second sentence the difference starts to express itself. With the "to form", the question makes more sense. How could someone know if they would like going out with someone unless they have already tried it? The infinitive form makes it more of a concept than an experience. In that same fashion, if two people are already dating, only the gerund form will work: Do you like going out with me?

Similar Threads

  1. Verb types
    By notmyname216 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 26-Jun-2005, 15:57
  2. "I can play A piano" or "I can play THE piano"?
    By Voytec in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 16-Mar-2005, 10:18
  3. 'play' or 'play on' the computer?
    By annliutaipei in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Oct-2004, 09:15
  4. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-Apr-2004, 15:50
  5. drive "slow" or drive "slowly": the diff
    By infinikyte in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2003, 17:15

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •