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  1. #1
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    Default Hobby: watch movies, see movies?

    Are the following correct? (Something I always wanted to ask, but never get around.)

    1. My hobbies are watching movies, playing Nintendo, collecting stamps, etc.

    2. Did you see the movie, "Crouching tigers, hidden dragon?"

    3. Would you like to watch a movie with me at my home tonight?

    4. Would you like to go to a movie with me tonight?

    Thanks.
    BMO

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Those are all perfectly correct.

    :)

    Ask some more questions like that. This is easy stuff.

    :wink:

  3. #3
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    Thanks, I think I am regressing. Okay, here is an idiom, my favorite topics:

    "Two heads are better than one." Is it two people or any number as long as it is more than one?

    Can I define it like, "People working together get better results than one does alone?" How about, "When working on the same project, more people consult with each other get better results than one does alone?"

    How would you define it?

    Thanks again, BMO

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    You can- two heads can refer to more than two people.

  5. #5
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    I would say that "Two heads are better than one" means that two (or more) can come up with more ideas than one person. There is another one that means the opposite: too many cooks spoil the broth. That means that too many people "helping" can lead to a bad result. (Presumably, not everybody knows what everybody else is doing.) The two aren't really opposites since one is about thinking up ideas and the other is about participating in some sort of activity.

    :)

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    Hey, thank you all. This makes a lot of sense, as the idiom is not about activity, but thinking. That I wasn't sure. Another point is also well explained - that part about "Too many cooks spoil the soup" not being an opposite idiom. It was often cited as such, but that clearly isn't the case.

    BMO

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    We're glad to help.

    :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I would say that "Two heads are better than one" means that two (or more) can come up with more ideas than one person. There is another one that means the opposite: too many cooks spoil the broth. That means that too many people "helping" can lead to a bad result. (Presumably, not everybody knows what everybody else is doing.) The two aren't really opposites since one is about thinking up ideas and the other is about participating in some sort of activity.

    :)
    An opposite idiom of "Too many cooks spoil the broth" is "There is safety in numbers." The latter means the more people the better.

    BMO

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmo

    An opposite idiom of "Too many cooks spoil the broth" is "There is safety in numbers." The latter means the more people the better.

    BMO
    We also have 'Many hands make light work'.

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