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    #1

    How to use the words "since" and "from"

    I would like to know when we should use the word "Since" and the word "from"

    Dharanija

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: How to use the words "since" and "from"

    Quote Originally Posted by dharanija35 View Post
    I would like to know when we should use the word "Since" and the word "from"

    Dharanija
    since (sĭns)
    adv.
    1. From then until now or between then and now: They left town and haven't been here since.
    2. Before now; ago: a name long since forgotten.
    3. After some point in the past; at a subsequent time: My friend has since married and moved to California.
    prep.
    1. Continuously from: They have been friends since childhood.
    2. Intermittently from: She's been skiing since childhood.
    conj.
    1. During the period subsequent to the time when: He hasn't been home since he graduated.
    2. Continuously from the time when: They have been friends ever since they were in grade school.
    3. Inasmuch as; because: Since you're not interested, I won't tell you about it.
    from (frŭm, frŏm; frəm when unstressed)
    prep.
      1. Used to indicate a specified place or time as a starting point: walked home from the station; from six o'clock on. See Usage Note at escape, whence.
      2. Used to indicate a specified point as the first of two limits: from grades four to six.
    1. Used to indicate a source, cause, agent, or instrument: a note from the teacher; taking a book from the shelf.
    2. Used to indicate separation, removal, or exclusion: keep someone from making a mistake; liberation from bondage.
    3. Used to indicate differentiation: know right from wrong.
    4. Because of: faint from hunger.
    idiom:

    from away Chiefly Maine.
    1. Not native to a state or locality.

    [Middle English, from Old English fram, forward, from.]


    The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright © 2004, 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


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    #3

    Re: How to use the words "since" and "from"

    Hi,
    I may be wrong, but the problem for ESLs resides where they overlap:
    since/from Monday, early morning, 2 o’clock etc. Are they sometimes interchangeable?
    Tnx

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: How to use the words "since" and "from"

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Hi,
    I may be wrong, but the problem for ESLs resides where they overlap:
    since/from Monday, early morning, 2 o’clock etc. Are they sometimes interchangeable?
    Tnx
    If you say since Monday then you mean from Monday till now. If you want to talk about a specific time period say from Monday till Friday (for example)>

    ~R


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    #5

    Re: How to use the words "since" and "from"

    Thanks, RonBee,
    So since is alone and from goes together with till?

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: How to use the words "since" and "from"

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Thanks, RonBee,
    So since is alone and from goes together with till?
    Yep. We use since by itself, and from with till. Examples:
    He's been working since dawn.
    Farmers work from sunrise till sunset.


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    #7

    Re: How to use the words "since" and "from"

    Thanks, RonBee.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: How to use the words "since" and "from"

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Thanks, RonBee.
    Now for more:

    We also use "from" alone with a fixed point.

    I am leaving two weeks from Monday.


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    #9

    Re: How to use the words "since" and "from"

    Thanks, I appreciate it.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: How to use the words "since" and "from"

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Thanks, I appreciate it.
    You're welcome.

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