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  1. #1
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    Meaning of a sentence

    Hi there,

    I don't understand the meaning of the following sentence:
    Can Iran's Islamic rulers deal with the challenges of a burgeoning women's liberation movement?
    Basically, I have problems to understand this sentence because of the words "deal" and "challenges". In this context, what does "deal" mean? find an agreement? negotiate?
    And what about "challenges"? does it refer to a demand, dispute, goal, aim?

    By any chance, could someone tell me what would be the Spanish translation?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Re: Meaning of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by silviasabater_2000 View Post
    Hi there,

    I don't understand the meaning of the following sentence:
    Can Iran's Islamic rulers deal with the challenges of a burgeoning women's liberation movement?
    Basically, I have problems to understand this sentence because of the words "deal" and "challenges". In this context, what does "deal" mean? find an agreement? negotiate?
    And what about "challenges"? does it refer to a demand, dispute, goal, aim?

    By any chance, could someone tell me what would be the Spanish translation?

    Thanks
    My Spanish is not good enough, so I will not attempt to translate.

    However, 'deal with the challenges' means 'be comfortable with the demands'.

    'deal with' in this context roughly means 'work with'. In other words, can the Islamic rulers be comfortable with adapting their practices to a situation where women want more equality? 'Deal' here does not have its usual English meanng of 'barter' - rather, it means 'I do not like it, but I can come to terms with it'. The British ex-Prime Minister Mrs. Thatcher used it this way when she said of Mikhael Gorbachev "This is a man we can deal with."

    'Challenges' here does not refer to the actions of the women's movement. It means that the Islamic rulers must alter their behaviour to accommodate the demands of the women's movement - this is a 'challenge' to them. Can they respond?

  3. #3
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    Re: Meaning of a sentence

    Thank you for your help. I understand that the mening of the sentence is: Can Iran's Islamic rulers cope with the demands of a burgeoning women's liberation movement?
    From your explanation I understand that challenge is connected with the Islamic rulers, is that right? So the demands of this movement is a challenge to the rulers?
    Just another question about this sentence: Are the rulers the government?
    I wonder if you could help me with another sentence I'm having problems with: "By their sheer numbers, women are challenging the Islamic Republic to change".
    "Sheer numbers" does it mean numerous women, a lot of women?

    Thanks Coffa

  4. #4
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    Re: Meaning of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by silviasabater_2000 View Post
    Thank you for your help. I understand that the mening of the sentence is: Can Iran's Islamic rulers cope with the demands of a burgeoning women's liberation movement?
    Yes, that's right.

    Quote Originally Posted by silviasabater_2000 View Post
    From your explanation I understand that challenge is connected with the Islamic rulers, is that right? So the demands of this movement is a challenge to the rulers?
    Yes.


    Quote Originally Posted by silviasabater_2000 View Post
    Just another question about this sentence: Are the rulers the government?
    I would interpret it that way, but 'rulers' is not precise enough to definitely restrict the sense to the government. It might be interpreted more generally to include leading Islamic clerics outside the government, for example.

    Quote Originally Posted by silviasabater_2000 View Post
    I wonder if you could help me with another sentence I'm having problems with: "By their sheer numbers, women are challenging the Islamic Republic to change".
    "Sheer numbers" does it mean numerous women, a lot of women?
    'Sheer' has several meanings. Here it means 'by their numbers and nothing else'. Women are challenging the Islamic Republic to change, simply because they are so numerous. 'Sheer' is used in this way to emphasise that its noun is the ONLY factor involved. For example: "The battle was won through sheer force of arms."

  5. #5
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    Re: Meaning of a sentence

    Thank you. Your comments have been very useful

  6. #6
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    Re: Meaning of a sentence

    Hi thee,

    I am still having "challenging" difficulties.
    In the sentence "By their sheer numbers, women are challenging the Islamic Republic to change", what's the meaning of challenging here?
    Still another question: "A husband may no longer obtain a divorce automatically and without a sizable alimony", What does it mean? that a husband cannot obtain a divorce automatically and that also cannot obtain a divorce without an alimony? Or it means that a husband cannot obtain an automatic divorce if he does not have an alimony?

    Thanks

  7. #7
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    Re: Meaning of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by silviasabater_2000 View Post
    Hi thee,

    I am still having "challenging" difficulties.
    In the sentence "By their sheer numbers, women are challenging the Islamic Republic to change", what's the meaning of challenging here?
    Still another question: "A husband may no longer obtain a divorce automatically and without a sizable alimony", What does it mean? that a husband cannot obtain a divorce automatically and that also cannot obtain a divorce without an alimony? Or it means that a husband cannot obtain an automatic divorce if he does not have an alimony?

    Thanks
    "Challenging XXX to change" means they are demanding/openly calling for change.

    The second means there have been two changes:

    1. Divorces are no longer automatic
    2. Divorces are not granted with alimony

    If it were your second explanation, the sentence would be:

    "A husband may no longer obtain a divorce automatically without a sizable alimony."

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