Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Haihao is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    39
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Due to or owing to?

    Hi,

    Could you tell me the difference between due to and owing to? e.g. 'his success is due to...' but not 'owing to', why?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Haihao is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    39
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Due to or owing to?

    Sorry, my misoperation.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,099
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Due to or owing to?

    To most people, there's no real difference, but purists say that 'due to' should be used as an adjective, as it is here because it modfies 'success':
    http://www.bartleby.com/64/C003/0107.html

  4. #4
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Due to or owing to?

    Due to the late hour, I will have to be going to bed soon.

    It is hard for me to say, as I don't think I even use owing to. Perhaps others can be more helpful.

    ~R

    (Good night.)



    Edited to add:
    Last edited by RonBee; 04-Dec-2006 at 03:14. Reason: to add something

  5. #5
    curmudgeon's Avatar
    curmudgeon is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,658
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Due to or owing to?

    They are the same. 'Due to', 'owing to', 'because of' can all be used. Why do you think it is wrong?

    This sheds some light;

    http://www.surrey.ac.uk/Skills/pack/english/due.html

  6. #6
    curmudgeon's Avatar
    curmudgeon is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,658
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Due to or owing to?


  7. #7
    Haihao is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    39
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Due to or owing to?

    The full sentence is:

    His success was ____ the support he got from the team, which is also in:

    http://www.usingenglish.com/members/...hp?quiz_id=400

  8. #8
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,099
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Due to or owing to?

    It's adjectival and its not at the beginning. It's picky and in ordinary usage, I wouldn't be troubled by any particular use or position of them.

  9. #9
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    14,474
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Due to or owing to?

    Quote Originally Posted by Haihao View Post
    The full sentence is:

    His success was ____ the support he got from the team, which is also in:

    http://www.usingenglish.com/members/...hp?quiz_id=400
    I agree with Tdol; the older objections to "due to" as a preposition are not terribly relevant. This is from the AHD:

    due to
    prep.
    Because of.
    USAGE NOTE Due to has been widely used for many years as a compound preposition like owing to, but some critics have insisted that due should be used only as an adjective. According to this view, it is incorrect to say The concert was canceled due to the rain, but acceptable to say The cancellation of the concert was due to the rain, where due continues to function as an adjective modifying cancellation. This seems a fine point, however, and since due to is widely used and understood, there seems little reason to avoid using it as a preposition.


    The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright © 2004, 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

  10. #10
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,099
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Due to or owing to?

    But it is still tested in some places, like Gmat, which is why it's there.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. sometime, some time, due to, owing to
    By Ju in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Nov-2006, 18:33
  2. because of; owing to and due to
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 28-May-2004, 21:31
  3. grammar
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 17-Dec-2003, 19:02

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •