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  1. #11
    David Sims's Avatar
    David Sims is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: English idiom "Chewing Your Words" reprise thread

    Quote Originally Posted by David Sims View Post
    The phrase "chewing your words" means supplying exaggerated enunciation while speaking, usually to provide a subtext, or to convey a secondary message. For example, someone might imply, by chewing her words, that someone else is a stupid person who needs more than the customary degree of verbal articulation in order to ensure comprehension.
    In writing, the narrator might chew his words by using italics, or by intentionally capitalizing the initial letters of words that are not ordinarily capitalized, to indicate that they would have been, if spoken, pronounced very carefully, as though he were speaking to a child.

  2. #12
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: English idiom "Chewing Your Words" reprise thread

    Quote Originally Posted by David Sims View Post
    The phrase "chewing your words" means supplying exaggerated enunciation while speaking, usually to provide a subtext, or to convey a secondary message. For example, someone might imply, by chewing her words, that someone else is a stupid person who needs more than the customary degree of verbal articulation in order to ensure comprehension.

    A literary example of the use of the idiom can be found in the fantasy novel Suldrun's Garden, by Jack Vance.
    In the 'literary' example you quote, it would perhaps be more natural to understand the words 'without chewing your words' to mean 'speaking clearly'.
    In writing, the narrator might chew his words by using italics, or by intentionally capitalizing the initial letters of words that are not ordinarily capitalized, to indicate that they would have been, if spoken, pronounced very carefully, as though he were speaking to a child.
    Have you any evidence at all of this use of 'chew one's words', or have you just invented it?

  3. #13
    probus's Avatar
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    Default Re: English idiom "Chewing Your Words" reprise thread

    I think "chew your words" has no established meaning in English. Certainly I don't know one.

  4. #14
    JMurray is online now Key Member
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    Default Re: English idiom "Chewing Your Words" reprise thread

    not a teacher

    Perhaps this is a variation on "Don't mince your words".
    mince words - Idioms - by the Free Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
    This seems to fit the OP's example in post #9, where one person is encouraging the other to speak candidly.

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