Results 1 to 7 of 7

    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 27
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    "One level removed" and "One level added"

    Dear Teacher,

    Reading the book "The Dilbert's Principle" I have found an expresion that I think I understand, but I'd rather to feel sure of the meaning. It is "One level removed". I uderstand that is about something that can be removed without a negative effect. I would have written "one level removable", but it says "One level removed". I think that Scott Adams knows what he writes.

    Best wishes.

    Hector.


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: "One level removed" and "One level added"

    Quote Originally Posted by Albino View Post
    Dear Teacher,

    Reading the book "The Dilbert's Principle" I have found an expresion that I think I understand, but I'd rather to feel sure of the meaning. It is "One level removed". I uderstand that is about something that can be removed without a negative effect. I would have written "one level removable", but it says "One level removed". I think that Scott Adams knows what he writes.

    Best wishes.

    Hector.
    I think you've probably misunderstood the meaning of the phrase. The word 'removed' in this context really means 'distant from'. A common use is to describe a second or third cousin, as in "he was my cousin once removed." That is, he was the son of the cousin of my mother or father.

    Another example would be: "The decisions of management are one level removed from the daily decisions of the workers."


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 27
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: "One level removed" and "One level added"

    Coffa,

    Thank you very much. Today I learnt two things; one about relatives and the other about a management concept. I wouldn’t have ever guessed this meaning of the word ‘removed’.

    Again, thank you.

    Hector.

  1. Miner49'er's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Dutch
      • Home Country:
      • Belgium
      • Current Location:
      • Belgium

    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 412
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: "One level removed" and "One level added"

    "The decisions of management are one level removed from the daily decisions of the workers."
    To me, what is written here is perfectly understandable.
    Management decisions can have farther-reaching consequences than those made by workers.

    The former on the other hand would have puzzled me completely if I should have encountered it in a text.

    One to store!

  2. curmudgeon's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 1,657
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: "One level removed" and "One level added"

    Also 'one level added' is normally said as 'one level above'


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: "One level removed" and "One level added"

    Quote Originally Posted by Miner49'er View Post
    To me, what is written here is perfectly understandable.
    Management decisions can have farther-reaching consequences than those made by workers.

    The former on the other hand would have puzzled me completely if I should have encountered it in a text.

    One to store!
    The nuances of the cousin terminology continue to confuse me. I checked afterwards, and it is not precisely as I described, though the principle is unchanged. This URL may be useful for those interested:

    Cousins Explained

  3. Miner49'er's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Dutch
      • Home Country:
      • Belgium
      • Current Location:
      • Belgium

    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 412
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: "One level removed" and "One level added"

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffa View Post
    The nuances of the cousin terminology continue to confuse me. I checked afterwards, and it is not precisely as I described, though the principle is unchanged. This URL may be useful for those interested:

    Cousins Explained
    Difficult!

    But better than in the Flemish language.
    Here we speak about "achter achter achter neef" for a second cousin once removed.
    My wife is an expert in these matters. Myself, I'm losing track if any relationship is farther away than "next of kin"
    What I will retain for myself is "the greater the number the farther away"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •