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  1. #1
    snade17 is offline Member
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    Smile What do these phrases mean

    Hi, Could you explain the meaning of the following phrases or say in other words:
    1. In before the lock.
    2. Intel inside, idiot outside.
    3. Get a load of him/her.
    4. Heads up ace.
    5. Head and shoulders.

  2. #2
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    Re: What do these phrases mean

    2. This is a joke. "Intel inside" is a famous slogan for Intel microprocessors: you may have a sticker on your own computer proclaiming "Intel inside", meaning that your computer has an Intel processor. The "idiot outside" is the joke, and refers to the person operating the computer. For example, somebody might complain that their computer does strange things, and you might discover that the fault is not the computer, but something the user did to the computer. Later you might tell me, "The problem was: Intel inside, idiot outside."

    3. Take a good look at him/her.

    5. The expression "He was head and shoulders above the rest" can be quite literal -- he was so tall that his head and his shoulders were above everyone else's heads -- or metaphorical -- he was far better than the others. Head and Shoulders is also the brand name of an anti-dandruff shampoo, so called because it stops dandruff from forming in your hair and falling down onto your shoulders.

  3. #3
    svartnik is offline Banned
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    Re: What do these phrases mean

    IBTL - NetLingo Internet Dictionary | Online Dictionary of Computer and Internet Terms, Acronyms & Text Messaging
    get a load of her (look over there) -- she is gorgeous
    to be head and shoulders above sg else = much better

  4. #4
    curmudgeon's Avatar
    curmudgeon is offline Key Member
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    Re: What do these phrases mean

    As for number 4...

    This is rude; 'ace' is wrong.

    It means head up your backside. In other words you are preoccupied with yourself. 'He walks around with his head up his.... (I'll let you work it out for yourself)



  5. #5
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
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    Re: What do these phrases mean

    4. Heads up, Ace! Heads up! is a warning (I think from baseball--telling the onlookers to look up and watch out for a ball coming at them). Ace is an endearing nickname for someone who is good at something. The scenario would be you and I are playing on the same team and our opponents are on the attack. I would say to you, "Heads up, Ace. They're attacking our weak side."

  6. #6
    curmudgeon's Avatar
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    Re: What do these phrases mean

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    4. Heads up, Ace! Heads up! is a warning (I think from baseball--telling the onlookers to look up and watch out for a ball coming at them). Ace is an endearing nickname for someone who is good at something. The scenario would be you and I are playing on the same team and our opponents are on the attack. I would say to you, "Heads up, Ace. They're attacking our weak side."

    I prefer my interpretation

  7. #7
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
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    Re: What do these phrases mean

    Yes, I figured you would, Ace.

  8. #8
    curmudgeon's Avatar
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    Re: What do these phrases mean


  9. #9
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    Re: What do these phrases mean

    Curmudgeon,

    Can you tell me what is wrong with the word "ace" in that phrase please?
    I can't find anything rude or wrong in its description.
    Or can it have another meaning used in combination with "Heads up"
    e.g. like "*ss"? (please forgive my French)

    Ace
    n. 1. Games. A single spot or pip on a playing card, die, or domino. A playing card, die, or domino having one spot or pip. 2. Sports. In racket games: A serve that one's opponent fails to return. A point scored by such a serve. 3. Sports. The act of hitting a golf ball in the hole with one's first shot. 4. A military aircraft pilot who has destroyed five or more enemy aircraft. 5. An expert in a given field.adj. Topnotch; first-rate.v. tr. aced, ac-ing, ac-es. 1. Sports. To serve an ace against. 2. Sports. To hit an ace in golf. 3. Slang. To get the better of (someone): a candidate who aced his opponents in the primaries. 4. Slang. To receive a grade of A on: She aced the exam. --idiom. ace in the hole. A hidden advantage or resource kept in reserve until needed. within an ace of. On the verge of; very near to: came within an ace of losing the election.[Middle English as, from Old French, from Latin, unit.]

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    Excerpted from American Heritage Talking Dictionary
    Copyright 1997 The Learning Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  10. #10
    curmudgeon's Avatar
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    Re: What do these phrases mean

    I was thinking more along the lines of mispronunciation. The pitfalls of meaning something but saying something else. There is nothing wrong with the word 'ace'

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