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Thread: verb tenses

  1. #1
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    Default verb tenses

    With the base form of the word "draw," is it also the infinite form of the word? If it is the infinite form, the word "to" would be placed before it, right? However, "to" is not the only word that can be placed in front of the word. For example: The kids draw well.

    If this is intelligible enough, please get back.
    Are there any gammarians in San Antonio, Texas that would tutor weekly for a few hours for their lawn mowed and $5 an hour. We could barter.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: verb tenses

    Welcome Robert.

    draw is the base form. It's the form we find in the dictionary. It lacks inflection. That is, it's bare of extra sounds or words like, -s, -ing, -ew, called infection.

    bare infinitive
    n.
    In English, the infinitive without to, as used with modal auxiliary verbs. In the sentence I must go to the store now, the verb go is a bare infinitive.

    to draw is its infinitive form. The word to is called an infinitive marker. Don't confuse it with the preposition to. That's a whole 'nother word category. Now, if we remove the infinitive marker to, the result draw is called a bare infinitive.

    Now, the sentence The kids draw well doesn't house a base form. It's a present tense verb and its inflection is covert (unseen, unheard). In English 3rd person singular, present tense verbs show inflection. Like this,

    Singular
    1st person: I draw
    2nd person: you draw
    3rd person: s/he draws
    3rd person: it draws

    Plural
    1st person: we draw
    2nd person: you (guys) draw
    3rd person: they draw

    Here's an example of a bare infinitive and a to-infinitive

    Ex: Could you help me to wash the dishes? <to-infinitive>
    Ex: Coould you help me wash the dishes? <bare>
    Hope that helps.
    Last edited by Casiopea; 17-Dec-2006 at 07:17.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: verb tenses

    So, are you saying "base form" is equivalent to "bare infinitive." Yes, thank you, your response was helpful.

    What is most difficult is that many sources use varying terminologies.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: verb tenses

    Ah, yes. Sadly, terminology has always been a problem.

    These are verbs in the base form:

    leave
    want
    excel
    pass

    Notice how there is no s, ed, or other part attached to the end of the verb.

    These are not verbs in the base form:

    leaves, left, leaving
    wants, wanted, wanting
    excels, excelled, excelling
    passes, passed, passing

    Some teachers use different terms to refer to the infinitive without the to. Some of these terms include:

    bare infinitive
    root of the verb
    verb root
    dictionary form

    These terms are also acceptable ways to refer to the base form. Source



    Hope that helps.

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