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  1. sage
    Guest
    #1

    i got the three questions

    Excuse me, i got the three questions!

    1.Hugh let out a whoop of laughter.

    Q1: What does "let out" mean here? thanks^^


    2.You can't risk it, not with the championships so close.

    Q2: Why it should have been use 'not' after the comma?


    3.Have you got your hooks into John Powell yet ?

    Q3: What's 'hook' stand for ? thanks^^


    Thanks a lot!^^

  2. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
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      • United States
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      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,570
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2
    1.Hugh let out a whoop of laughter.

    Q1: What does "let out" mean here? thanks^^
    It means released. The laughter wanted out; so he released it. :)

    2.You can't risk it, not with the championships so close.

    Q2: Why it should have been use 'not' after the comma?
    The repetition of not serves to emphasize the first part of the statement. It could be said as You can't risk it with the championships so close, but the way it is said in the example sentence is perhaps a little more emphatic.

    3.Have you got your hooks into John Powell yet ?

    Q3: What's 'hook' stand for ? thanks^^
    If you have hooked a fish that means you have caught it. If you have your hooks into somebody that means that person has fallen for you (is attracted to you).

    :)

  3. sage
    Guest
    #3
    thanks RonBee^^

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: i got the three questions

    Quote Originally Posted by sage
    Excuse me, i got the three questions!

    1.Hugh let out a whoop of laughter.

    Q1: What does "let out" mean here? thanks^^


    2.You can't risk it, not with the championships so close.

    Q2: Why it should have been use 'not' after the comma?


    3.Have you got your hooks into John Powell yet ?

    Q3: What's 'hook' stand for ? thanks^^

    Hello,

    Say
    "I have got three questions." OR
    "I've got three questions."
    "I have three questions."
    "I've three questions."

    When some native speakers say "I've got", the '-ve' part is almost silent, but it's actually there.

    All the best,


    Thanks a lot!^^

  5. sage
    Guest
    #5
    Casiopea , thanks for help!!^^ Now i see! hah

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