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    #1

    Usage of 'live wire'

    If somebody says " don't talk to him right now, he's a live wire!", meaning the person not to be talked to is upset and might react violently; would this be correct usage! When I checked it out in the dictionary it meant 'lively, full of energy...' and yet it kind of makes sense when used it this context! Is it correctly used?

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Usage of 'live wire'

    I agree with the dictionary definition.

    Monica's a very quiet girl, but her little sister is a real livewire.

    If you wanted to suggest someone was hyper-sensitive, you'd be more likely to refer to electricity like this:

    If you go near him, sparks might fly.

    But you'd be more likely to refer to another sort of explosion:

    Don't go near him - he's on a short fuse.

    b

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    #3

    Re: Usage of 'live wire'

    Thanks for the quick response!

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    #4

    Re: Usage of 'live wire'

    Quote Originally Posted by Agnes View Post
    Thanks for the quick response!
    You're welcome, Agnes.

    About 'on a short fuse' - it refers to a temporary condition. If someone is permanently/constitutionally short-tempered, 'he's got a short fuse'.


    b

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