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  1. #1
    tara is offline Member
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    Smile Leave the floor? Drive a stick?

    Hi

    I have two questions.

    1. When a basket player says " I never left the floor during a game.",
    does he mean he just concentrated training for a game?
    I'm not sure what "leave the floor" means.

    2. A girl is about to give a present to a boy.
    He says "Hand me the keys. I'll figure out how to drive a stick eventually."
    Does "stick" here mean "bar" or "cue stick"?
    I know he's joking, but I wonder why he says "drive a stick" anyway.

    Thank you,
    Tara

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Leave the floor? Drive a stick?

    Possible answers (I'm not a basket ball player)

    1: a basketball player's foot/feet must not leave the ground when he/she has the ball in his/her hands ready to pass

    2: Drive a manual stick-shift car, not an automatic geared one

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Leave the floor? Drive a stick?

    Quote Originally Posted by tara View Post
    Hi

    I have two questions.

    1. When a basket player says " I never left the floor during a game.",
    does he mean he just concentrated training for a game?
    I'm not sure what "leave the floor" means.
    It's 40 years since I played competitive basketball (basket is a faux ami Tara), but I think he was saying that he was always one of the five players on court - maybe he was complaining about the effort, or maybe he was proud of committing so few personal fouls - the context would explain.

    Quote Originally Posted by tara View Post
    2. A girl is about to give a present to a boy.
    He says "Hand me the keys. I'll figure out how to drive a stick eventually."
    Does "stick" here mean "bar" or "cue stick"?
    I know he's joking, but I wonder why he says "drive a stick" anyway.

    Thank you,
    Tara
    Again, the context isn't clear. But I suspect he's making two jokes:

    1 The present is a car ['Hand me the keys']
    2 The difference between driving an automatic and a car with a gear-shift is trivial.

    I've never met the expression 'drive a stick', but that's my guess.

    b

  4. #4
    tara is offline Member
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    Smile Re: Leave the floor? Drive a stick?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Possible answers (I'm not a basket ball player)

    1: a basketball player's foot/feet must not leave the ground when he/she has the ball in his/her hands ready to pass

    2: Drive a manual stick-shift car, not an automatic geared one

    Hello Anglika,

    I'm sorry for making you think because I didn't explain the situation.
    And thank you very much for your kind explanation.

    The holiday season is coming. I hope yours is a good one.

    Thank you,
    Tara

  5. #5
    tara is offline Member
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    Smile Re: Leave the floor? Drive a stick?

    Hello Bobk,

    Thank you very much for your kind and detailed explanation.
    I'm sorry I didn't tell you the situation.
    I'll be more specific when I ask a question.


    >(basket is a faux ami Tara)

    Oh, I didn't know that...
    I should be careful when I talk about basketball.
    Thank you for pointing it out.


    >but I think he was saying that he was always one of the five players on court - maybe he was complaining about the effort, or maybe he was proud of committing so few personal fouls - the context would explain.

    I think the former makes sense.


    >Again, the context isn't clear. But I suspect he's making two jokes:

    1 The present is a car ['Hand me the keys']
    2 The difference between driving an automatic and a car with a gear-shift is trivial.

    Yes, these make sense to me, too.

    Thank you again for your lucid explanation.
    I hope you'll have a nice holiday.

    Tara

  6. #6
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Leave the floor? Drive a stick?

    Quote Originally Posted by tara View Post
    ...
    Thank you again for your lucid explanation.
    I hope you'll have a nice holiday.

    Tara
    It was a pleasure Tara - I hope you do too

  7. #7
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Leave the floor? Drive a stick?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    2 The difference between driving an automatic and a car with a gear-shift is trivial.
    I've never met the expression 'drive a stick', but that's my guess.
    b

    The difference between driving the two is anything but trivial. I've been driving for <mumble mumble> years, and I still can't drive a stick. ("Drive a stick" is a common AmE phrase, and it means to be able to drive a car with a manual transmission.) There have been instances where car thieves have been caught because they'd accidentally jacked a car with a manual trans and didn't know how to drive it. My husband has tried to teach me a time or two, but he quit before I hurt anyone. :)

  8. #8
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Leave the floor? Drive a stick?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    The difference between driving the two is anything but trivial.
    I know - my brother-in-law (English, but who has lived in the US for about 20 years) bought a manual recently partly because he prefers it but partly because it would ensure that his children couldn't borrow it.

    b

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