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Thread: proposition

  1. #1
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    I study at a business college, not in a business college, correct?

    Thanks.

    BMO

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    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    Either could be used, depending on the context.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red5
    Either could be used, depending on the context.
    Could you please give me some examples?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmo
    Quote Originally Posted by Red5
    Either could be used, depending on the context.
    Could you please give me some examples?
    There may be a difference here between American and British English. In AE, we would use "study at a business college" if we meant we were attending that college. We could, however, say that we study "in a business college" if we went to one to do our studying (preparing for other classes).

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    Got it, thanks to Red5 and Mike.

    BMO

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmo
    Got it, thanks to Red5 and Mike.

    BMO
    You're very welcome. :D

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    Another one please,

    I am bored on the job and I am bored with the job, what is the difference here? Are both correct grammatically? Thanks and have a great day.

    BMO

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmo
    Another one please,

    I am bored on the job and I am bored with the job, what is the difference here? Are both correct grammatically? Thanks and have a great day.

    BMO
    I'd say that both are correct. The first means that you are bored when you are on the job, i.e., when you are working. The second means that the job itself bores you. That doesn't seem like much of a difference to me.

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    Thanks Mike, it seems like "on the job" could be a temporary thing, like I am bored today because there is not enough work to do, whereas "with the job" is permanent; the job itself isn't challenging enough. Does it make sense?

    BMO

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    It does, but 'on the job'probably means anytime you're working. 'With'suggests the malaise is more serious and doesn't end with the end of the working day.

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