Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: either


    • Join Date: Mar 2005
    • Posts: 114
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Question either

    Could anyone tell me how to pronounce "either"? I am puzzled because I don't know how the Americans pronounce it and if the British pronounce differently.

    Again, please correct me if there is any mistake in the above question itself or better way to express it. Great thanks!

    Emily


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: either

    Hi, Emily,
    AE -[i:]
    BE -[ai]
    It's up to you, but it must be consistent with your general choice (other words that are pronounced differently, eg past, ask etc).
    Regards


    • Join Date: Mar 2005
    • Posts: 114
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: either

    Wonderful! But, haven't realized that the American pronunciation and the British pronunciaiton differ regarding even the simple words like "past" and "ask". Could you, Humble, or anyone else tell me how? Thanks!

    And, again, need some one to correct each and every error I've made so far. Yes, even in this "pronunciation and phonetics" forum, haha!

    Emily
    Last edited by emily wong; 31-Dec-2006 at 07:24.


    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 438
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: either

    Quote Originally Posted by emily wong View Post
    Wonderful! But, haven't realized that the American pronunciation and the British pronunciaiton differ regarding even the simple words like "past" and "ask". Could you, Humble, or anyone else tell me how? Thanks!

    AmE - past, ask - The "a" sounds as in "cat"
    BrE - past, ask - The "a" sounds as in "cart"

    You hear people say "Tomato (toh-may-toh), tomato (toh-mah-toh), what's the difference?"
    Quote Originally Posted by emily wong View Post
    And, again, need some one to correct each and every error I've made so far. Yes, even in this "pronunciation and phonetics" forum, haha! Emily
    some one --> someone


    • Join Date: Mar 2005
    • Posts: 114
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Question Re: either

    Thank you! I don't really know the "tomato" thing. Which is AmE? Emily


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: either

    AE - tomato [ei]
    Cheers


    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 438
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: either

    Quote Originally Posted by emily wong View Post
    Thank you! I don't really know the "tomato" thing. Which is AmE? Emily
    AmE - American English
    BrE - British English

  1. retro's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
    • Posts: 347
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: either

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Hi, Emily,
    AE -[i:]
    BE -[ai]
    It's up to you, but it must be consistent with your general choice (other words that are pronounced differently, eg past, ask etc).
    Regards
    However, I've heard some AmE speakers saying [ai].

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: either

    AUE: The Audio Archive

    If you're able to listen to audio files on your computer, the above site has a variety of different people reading sample passages with both an AmE and BrE accent.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 22
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10

    Re: either

    AE -[i:]
    BE -[ai]
    Actually in American English, [i] and [aI] are interchangeable in this word, although [i] is more common. Same for "neither".


    However, I've heard some AmE speakers saying [ai].
    I highly doubt that. In the Southern dialect, "past" would be pronounced as [pjʌst], which can sound like [paɪst].

    In General American, it's [].

    Both the California and the Canadian vowel shifts shift // to [a], however, so in progressive speakers of those dialects, "past" would be [past]. Conservative speakers tend to still use [] though.

    The Northern (especially Inland Northern) dialect on the other hand shifts // to [eɘ] or [ɛ] or even [iɘ]. Most other dialects do that only before nasals.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •