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    • Join Date: Dec 2006
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    #1

    Advice for a newbie. . .

    Hi all! I will be graduating with a BA in Linguistics and minors in French, Italian, and West European Studies. I would like to teach English to ADULTS and then ultimately become an administrator.

    I would like to get some experience teaching adults abroad, but I don't know of places that would hire a person with little to no previous teaching experience. Particularly, I am interested in summer teaching because I will be in school during the academic year.

    Does anyone know of such institutions that have teaching oppertunities in the summer? I am particularly concerned with locations in Europe (East or West), South America, Japan, Thailand, and South Korea....ideally, I would prefer to work in Italy or a French-speaking country so that I could also practice my own foreign languages outside of the classroom, but I understand that I cannot always get what I want, thus I gleefully consider other countries as well!

    Also, I would like to know where I could get qualification in teaching Business English. Any suggestions?

    Lastly, is it difficult for Americans to find **legal** work abroad due to the fact that they are American? Besides all the red tape with getting a work permit, do English Language Institutes prefer those with British accents?

  1. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Mar 2006
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    #2

    Re: Advice for a newbie. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by AppleLinguist View Post
    Hi all! I will be graduating with a BA in Linguistics and minors in French, Italian, and West European Studies. I would like to teach English to ADULTS and then ultimately become an administrator.

    I would like to get some experience teaching adults abroad, but I don't know of places that would hire a person with little to no previous teaching experience. Particularly, I am interested in summer teaching because I will be in school during the academic year.

    Does anyone know of such institutions that have teaching oppertunities in the summer? I am particularly concerned with locations in Europe (East or West), South America, Japan, Thailand, and South Korea....ideally, I would prefer to work in Italy or a French-speaking country so that I could also practice my own foreign languages outside of the classroom, but I understand that I cannot always get what I want, thus I gleefully consider other countries as well!

    Also, I would like to know where I could get qualification in teaching Business English. Any suggestions?

    Lastly, is it difficult for Americans to find **legal** work abroad due to the fact that they are American? Besides all the red tape with getting a work permit, do English Language Institutes prefer those with British accents?
    You may find difficulty in getting a short contract. You will not have a problem with an American accent as long as it's not Deep South or Brooklyn or some such.

    Others here will be able to advise you more.


    • Join Date: Dec 2006
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    #3

    Re: Advice for a newbie. . .

    Thanks! I actually have neither a Southern nor a Brooklynese accent so I suppose I am in the clear in that regard!

  2. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
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    #4

    Re: Advice for a newbie. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by AppleLinguist View Post
    Lastly, is it difficult for Americans to find **legal** work abroad due to the fact that they are American? Besides all the red tape with getting a work permit, do English Language Institutes prefer those with British accents?
    It most certainly varies from country to county, and sometimes from province to province.

    In Germany at any rate, there aren't too many legal problems, although the paperwork can be a nightmare. To be granted a work permit, your employer has to demonstrate that they could not get a EU citizen to do the job; either because no properly qualified and/or experienced EU citizens applied for the job, or because the job is best done by a non-EU citizen. "Teaching American English" definitely falls into the latter category. I believe laws are similar in other EU countries, but I can't say for sure.

    As for whether people want British or American English, that depends. British English is usually taught in schools, and since Britain and Ireland are in Europe, British English is obviously in high demand. On the other hand, the US is a major gobal economic power, and many companies do need to use American English. American English is also pretty much standard in southeast Asia, the home of other major international markets and companies. So there is a demand for American English, and I myself know many American teachers here in Germany.


    • Join Date: Dec 2006
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    #5

    Re: Advice for a newbie. . .

    I wouldn't mind working in Germany for a little bit. I was actually born there since my father was in the military. I miss Heidelberg .......on a side note, what does one have to do in order to become an EU citizen? Are there many ex-patriots from America that do TEFL as a profession? I'm just curious. Not that I woudl do this right away, but I would love to eventually move back to Europe for good. This would be after I've paid all my debts here in the States (that is, student loans) and have no other obligations here, so we are talking several years from now. It's still something I'm very much interested in. Thanks!!!

  3. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
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    #6

    Re: Advice for a newbie. . .

    To become an EU citizen, you have to become a citizen of one of the EU member states. Laws vary from country to country, but generally you have to live there legally for a certain period of time and jump through all sorts of bureaucratic hoops. It helps if you marry a native.

    Becoming a German citizen means giving up your US citizenship, since Germany does not recognise dual nationality. Most other countries will allow you to keep your US citizenship -- I'd definitely recommend hanging on to your US citizenship.

    I have no idea how many US ex-pats do TEFL in Germany, but there are quite a few. Most of them are in the old US zone (i.e. most of southern Germany): ex-military personnel who settled here.

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