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  1. #1
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    Default Beneath, underneath

    Coolman:
    The word underneath is more likely to be used in the physical sense. Example:
    It is underneath the table.

    The word beneath is more likely to be used in the metaphorical sense. Example:
    It is beneath me to do that type of work.
    ~R

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    Default Re: Beneath, underneath

    Was RonBee's reply based on a corpora search? I'm not sure I'm entirely convinced by it otherwise.

    But, in the Dire Straits 'version' of "Romeo & Juliet" there is a line:

    "He's underneath the window ... singing ... my boyfriend's back"

    in which the "underneath" (instead of 'beneath') seems a bit strange, save for the allowance we typically make for poetic licence.

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    Default Re: Beneath, underneath

    No, I didn't do a corpora search. I didn't need to. The poster (cooler) asked about the differences between the two words--not about their similarities. The words are synonyms, so they mostly mean the same thing, but there are ways they are used differently.


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    Default Re: Beneath, underneath

    Quote Originally Posted by drhatch View Post
    Was RonBee's reply based on a corpora search? I'm not sure I'm entirely convinced by it otherwise.

    But, in the Dire Straits 'version' of "Romeo & Juliet" there is a line:

    "He's underneath the window ... singing ... my boyfriend's back"

    in which the "underneath" (instead of 'beneath') seems a bit strange, save for the allowance we typically make for poetic licence.
    Happy New Year! drhatch.

    Juliet would do better to marry the window if Romeo were in fact beneath (metaphorically: lower in rank or station than) the window.

  5. #5
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Beneath, underneath

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    ...
    Juliet would do better to marry the window if Romeo were in fact beneath (metaphorically: lower in rank or station than) the window.
    Besides, drhatch, Mark Knopfler probably wanted three syllables (so that 'He's underneath' would match the guitar accompaniment); as you said, you have to allow for poetic license, and that particular writer links words and music very closely (MK writes and sings and plays - all his own stuff).

    Happy New Year!

    b

    ps FYI 'He's underneath the window... singing... your boyfriend's back'
    (My copy's on vinyl, and I can't play it at the moment. But that's the way I remember it - and besides, it makes more sense.)

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    Default Re: Beneath, underneath

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    ...
    ps FYI 'He's underneath the window... singing... your boyfriend's back'
    (My copy's on vinyl, and I can't play it at the moment. But that's the way I remember it - and besides, it makes more sense.)
    I just checked the sleeve notes, and you're right. It's a long time since I heard the record, and as it's a male voice singing I made the 'correction' in my memory (to make it fit better with the image in my mind).

    Sorry

    b

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