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  1. #1
    Eway is offline Senior Member
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    Default skipping, jumping, hopping

    What are the differences between skipping, jumping and hopping?

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    Default Re: skipping, jumping, hopping

    To my knowledge,

    skip: one foot touches the ground
    jump: both feet are off the ground
    hop: both feet are off the ground

    Note, for some speakers, jump rope and skip rope mean the same thing. Either both feet or one foot is off the ground.

    Note, the difference between hop and jump has to do with, I believe, two factors: recursion and/or height, the relative distance between feet and ground.

    Happy New Year! :smilcol:

  3. #3
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: skipping, jumping, hopping

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    To my knowledge,

    skip: one foot touches the ground
    jump: both feet are off the ground
    hop: both feet are off the ground

    Note, for some speakers, jump rope and skip rope mean the same thing. Either both feet or one foot is off the ground.

    Note, the difference between hop and jump has to do with, I believe, two factors: recursion and/or height, the relative distance between feet and ground.

    Happy New Year! :smilcol:
    Another difference, in my idiolect (which I think is pretty standard, BE): hopping involves taking off and landing on the same foot. This sounds a bit like your skipping - but that uses alternate feet.

    And another similarity: skip and jump can mean the same in this context: the stylus skipped/jumped a groove

    b

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    Default Re: skipping, jumping, hopping


  5. #5
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    curmudgeon is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: skipping, jumping, hopping

    'Hop, skip and jump' is a noun meaning a short distance

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    Default Re: skipping, jumping, hopping

    Quote Originally Posted by curmudgeon View Post
    'Hop, skip and jump' is a noun meaning a short distance.
    Right, they're semantically different in that noun phrase. But how are they different?

    videos are accepted

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: skipping, jumping, hopping

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Right, they're semantically different in that noun phrase. But how are they different?

    videos are accepted
    I don't think the semantics of the individual words come into it. The whole phrase just means 'a short distance'/'not far at all'/'a stone's throw'.



    b

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    Default Re: skipping, jumping, hopping

    Oh,... I know. I was just moderating, Bob, just trying to keep the thread on topic.

    Eway asked how skipping, jumping, and hopping differ, and I'm not quite clear on how curmudgeon's contribution on the semantically fused idiom "hop, skip, and a jump" falls into play there.
    Last edited by Casiopea; 02-Jan-2007 at 14:50.

  9. #9
    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Re: skipping, jumping, hopping

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Oh,... I know. I was just moderating, Bob, just trying to keep the thread on topic.

    Eway asked how skipping, jumping, and hopping differ, and I'm not quite clear on how curmudgeon's contribution on the semantically fused idiom "hop, skip, and a jump" falls into play there.
    Sorry, I thought so - should've known better.

    b

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    Default Re: skipping, jumping, hopping

    I'd respond with something kind and sweet, but there's way too much moderator traffic on this thread already. Agh. Oh, what the hay. BobK! You're a dear, caring soul.

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