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  1. #1
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    Default Meaning of the sentences

    I can ill afford to lose him.
    It's an ill wind that blows nobody good.
    Our soldiers were better drilled than those of enemies.

    What is the meaning of above sentences?

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    Default Re: Meaning of the sentences

    I can ill afford to lose him
    It would be a great loss if I should lose him.
    e.g. He is an essential asset, I cannot afford loosing him without damaging the company.

    It's an ill wind that blows nobody good.
    It's an ill wind - someone profits from every loss
    Said comfortingly of misfortunes that may bring some benefits.
    The full saying is 'It's an ill wind that blows nobody good', the emphasis being 'it is indeed a harsh wind if it damages everybody'.
    It was already proverbial when recorded by Thomas Tusser in Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry (1580) as 'It is an ill wind turns to good' (... if it makes nobody turn to doing something worthwhile), a version that makes better sense in implying that misfortune brings out the best in people.

    Our soldiers were better drilled than those of the enemy
    They were better prepared for battle than those of the enemy.
    Last edited by Miner49'er; 05-Jan-2007 at 10:23.

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    Default Re: Meaning of the sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Miner49'er View Post
    It would be a great loss if I should lose him.
    e.g. He is an essential asset, I cannot afford loosing him without damaging the company.

    It's an ill wind - someone profits from every loss
    Said comfortingly of misfortunes that may bring some benefits.
    The full saying is 'It's an ill wind that blows nobody good', the emphasis being 'it is indeed a harsh wind if it damages everybody'.
    It was already proverbial when recorded by Thomas Tusser in Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry (1580) as 'It is an ill wind turns to good' (... if it makes nobody turn to doing something worthwhile), a version that makes better sense in implying that misfortune brings out the best in people.

    They were better prepared for battle than those of the enemy.

    It was already proverbial when recorded by Thomas Tusser in Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry (1580) as 'It is an ill wind turns to good' (... if it makes nobody turn to doing something worthwhile), a version that makes better sense in implying that misfortune brings out the best in people.

    Could anyone explain me the above paragraph.

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    Default Re: Meaning of the sentences

    Here the "ill wind" stands for misfortune and sometimes misfortune can make people try harder to achieve their goals.

    Turns to good = "try harder to achieve their goals" or "brings out the best in people"

    Hope this is clear enough

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    Default Re: Meaning of the sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Miner49'er View Post
    Here the "ill wind" stands for misfortune and sometimes misfortune can make people try harder to achieve their goals.

    Turns to good = "try harder to achieve their goals" or "brings out the best in people"

    Hope this is clear enough
    Now, I understand (ill wind and turns to good). Thanks to all of you
    (1) it's an ill wind that turns nobody good.
    (2) if it makes nobody turn to doing something worthwhile), a version that makes better sense in implying that misfortune brings out the best in people

    What is the meaning of `nobody turn' or `turns nobody'?

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