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  1. #1
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    Default A chaise and four

    Hi,
    What does ‘a chaise and four’ in the following text mean?

    Why, my dear, you must know, Mrs. Long says that Netherfield is taken by a young man of large fortune from the north of England; that he came down on Monday in a chaise and four to see the place, and was so much delighted with it, that he agreed with Mr. Morris immediately; that he is to take possession before Michaelmas, and some of his servants are to be in the house by the end of next week."
    -Pride and Prejudice

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: A chaise and four

    It's a lightweight carriage drawn by four horses.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: A chaise and four

    A chaise and four (horses).

    Thank you again Miner49'er.

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    Default Re: A chaise and four

    Welcome

  5. #5
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    Default Re: A chaise and four

    Quote Originally Posted by MadHorse View Post
    A chaise and four (horses).
    Thank you again Miner49'er.
    By the way, this again is satirical. It's gossip. Mrs Bennett's world knows little of Mr Bingley (perhaps not even his name at that stage of the book) This young man came not on a horse, or in a gig (trendy, 'sports car' equivalent), or in a pony and trap (much less stylish), or even in a coach and pair. The fact that he came in a chaise and four means that he's rich (and in particular it's an indicator that Mrs B values things like that).

    b

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    Default Re: A chaise and four

    Hi Bob,
    Are chaise and four, coach and pair, pony and trap all common expressions of the time?
    Could it be possible that 'chaise and four' means a chaise with four wheels?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: A chaise and four

    Quote Originally Posted by MadHorse View Post
    Hi Bob,
    Are chaise and four, coach and pair, pony and trap all common expressions of the time?
    I think so, though 'pony and trap' could have arisen later.
    Could it be possible that 'chaise and four' means a chaise with four wheels?
    It's definitely the number of horses, as Miner49er said.
    There are many other sorts of carriage. I seem to remember Lady Catherine de Bourg has a 'brougham' (pronounced /bru:m/); I imagine that it, like Lady Catherine, is rather staid and doughty. There's also a 'high-perched phaeton'. I'll look around for some others.

    b

  8. #8
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    Default Re: A chaise and four etc.

    OK.
    Here is my last question of the day:
    In chapter six, Charlotte says a woman had better show more affection than she really feels, and that Bingley undoubtedly likes Jane, but he may never do more than like her, if she does not help him on. Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice, Chapter VI of Volume I (Chap. 6)
    To this Elisabeth replies: “Your plan is a good one, where nothing is in question but the desire of being well married; and if I were determined to get a rich husband, or any husband, I dare say I should adopt it…”
    Is Lizzy being sarcastic when she says “your plan is a good one, where nothing is in question but the desire of being well married”? Because Charlotte’s whole plan is about marrying well, therefore it’s all in question, all not good.
    Thanks in advance.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: A chaise and four etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by MadHorse View Post
    OK.
    Here is my last question of the day:
    In chapter six, Charlotte says a woman had better show more affection than she really feels, and that Bingley undoubtedly likes Jane, but he may never do more than like her, if she does not help him on. Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice, Chapter VI of Volume I (Chap. 6)
    To this Elisabeth replies: “Your plan is a good one, where nothing is in question but the desire of being well married; and if I were determined to get a rich husband, or any husband, I dare say I should adopt it…”
    Is Lizzy being sarcastic when she says “your plan is a good one, where nothing is in question but the desire of being well married”? Because Charlotte’s whole plan is about marrying well, therefore it’s all in question, all not good.
    Thanks in advance.
    This exchange is more crucial than it looks; I'll say no more than that until you've read a bit more - except to say that Lizzy is being a little sarcastic, but in a pretty gentle way - as she's very fond of Charlotte.

    b

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    Default Re: A chaise and four etc.

    Hello Bob,
    I have two more questions . Can you give me a hand ?
    #1
    At Sir Williams’ party, Lizzy told Charlotte that Darcy eavesdropped on her.
    "But if he does it any more I shall certainly let him know that I see what he is about. He has a very satirical eye, and if I do not begin by being impertinent myself, I shall soon grow afraid of him."
    On his approaching them soon afterwards, though without seeming to have any intention of speaking, Miss Lucas defied her friend to mention such a subject to him; which immediately provoking Elizabeth to do it, she turned to him and said:
    "Did you not think, Mr. Darcy, that I expressed myself uncommonly well just now, when I was teasing Colonel Forster to give us a ball at Meryton?"
    "With great energy; but it is always a subject which makes a lady energetic."
    "You are severe on us."
    "It will be _her_ turn soon to be teased," said Miss Lucas. "I am going to open the instrument, Eliza, and you know what follows." Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice, Chapter VI of Volume I (Chap. 6)
    I'd like to know:
    Why did Charlotte intentionally provoke Elizabeth to provoke Darcy?
    Why did Charlotte press the reluctant Lizzy to perform piano in the party?
    #2
    On Charlotte’s insisting, Lizzy said, ``Very well ; if it must be so, it must.'' And gravely glancing at Mr. Darcy, ``There is a fine old saying, which every body here is of course familiar with -- "Keep your breath to cool your porridge," -- and I shall keep mine to swell my song.''
    Did she mean she would argue no more to save her energy for the performance?
    Thank you very much,

    ps. Do thoes smillies make you dizzy? Sorry if they do. I was trying to make my contribution looks more exciting. I might have overdone it.
    Last edited by MadHorse; 09-Jan-2007 at 11:43.

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