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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Correct sentences

    Perhaps, our English experts could shed some light on the following sentences"

    1. Jane is about to take a putt in her golf tournament or Jane about to take a putt in her golf competition.

    2. You have done very well in your tennis and you also have done well in your studies or

    You have done very well in your tennis as well as in your studies.

    3. Your academic achievement has brought fame to your alma mater or Your academic achievement has brought the fame to your alma matter.

    The following questions relate to the use of English in sports news_ can we accept this type of English ?

    England have won a football tournament againt Spain. Can we use '" have" INSTEAD OF "HAS" ?

    England has qualified for the finals . Is it necessary to put ' s " for the final ? How many finals are there ?

    In sports write-ups , the pluralisation of championships confuses me. Can we do away with "S" for championship ?

    In the following sentences,many English experts say the use of " their" in the following sentence is acceptable grammatically. Language does change . Do you agree ?

    Sentence :

    Everybody has to play their role in helping the underprivileged . Would it be better if this sentence remains in its original structure ?

    e.g. Everbody has to play his or her role in helping the underprivileged.

    Three more questions about grammar :

    1. A team of riders streaming pass a bridge or A team of riders streaming pass the bridge. In this situation , the writer refers to only one bridge eventhough the riders may pass through two more bridges located miles ahead .

    2. Subscribe now to the Asiaweek magazine or subscribe to the Asiaweek magazine now ?

    3. The crowd cheeers out to this badminton player to continue fighting his fighting spirit. or the crowd cheers on to this badminton player to continue his fighting spirit.

    For your information, sentence 3 was written by a native speaker of English ( Australian).

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Correct sentences

    1. Jane is about to take a putt in her golf tournament or Jane about to take a putt in her golf competition.

    Jane is.... (The sentence needs a verb)

    2. You have done very well in your tennis and you also have done well in your studies or You have done very well in your tennis as well as in your studies.

    You have done well at tennis and in your studies.
    You have done well at tennis as well as in your studies.

    3. Your academic achievement has brought fame to your alma mater or Your academic achievement has brought the fame to your alma matter.

    ...has brought fame....

    England have won a football tournament against Spain. Can we use '" have" INSTEAD OF "HAS" ?

    England has won. It has won. England, the country, has won.

    England has qualified for the finals . Is it necessary to put ' s " for the final ? How many finals are there ?

    You need -s (finals). There could be more than one match in the finals.

    In sports write-ups , the pluralisation of championships confuses me. Can we do away with "S" for championship ?

    Yes. They won the championship. They won the championship games. They won the championships.

    In the following sentences, many English experts say the use of " their" in the following sentence is acceptable grammatically. Language does change . Do you agree ? Sentence :

    Everybody has to play their role in helping the underprivileged . Would it be better if this sentence remains in its original structure? e.g. Everbody has to play his or her role in helping the underprivileged.

    Either or is acceptable these days. "Everyone...s/he" is grammatically correct yet deemed by some people as politically incorrect, whereas "Everyone...they" is grammatically incorrect, but deemd politically correct by some people.

    1. A team of riders streaming passed a bridge or A team of riders streaming pass the bridge. In this situation, the writer refers to only one bridge even though the riders may pass through two more bridges located miles ahead.

    specific bridge = the bridge; non-specific bridge (any bridge) = a bridge.

    2. Subscribe now to the Asiaweek magazine or subscribe to the Asiaweek magazine now?

    Either or.

    3. The crowd cheers out to this badminton player to continue fighting his fighting spirit. or the crowd cheers on to this badminton player to continue his fighting spirit.

    The crowd cheers on the badminton player....

    All the best,

  3. #3
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    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default

    Just one small point. If it is the name of the publication then I would not use the definite article ("the"). Example:
    • Subscribe now to Asia Week magazine.


    Also, as Cas says, it should be they cheered the player on. (Perhaps that native-speaker Strine had had one too many ales.)

    :wink:

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