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  1. #1
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    Default What does this mean?

    The sentence:

    Lectures on videotape, on audiotape and--if delivered form detailed, antique notes--even in the lecture hall, come closer to the way knowledge is stored in books or on the Internet than to the manner in which it can be created and obtained through open questions and collaboration.

    Question:

    What does "detailed, antique notes" mean here??

    Taka

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    Default Re: What does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    The sentence:

    Lectures on videotape, on audiotape and--if delivered form detailed, antique notes--even in the lecture hall, come closer to the way knowledge is stored in books or on the Internet than to the manner in which it can be created and obtained through open questions and collaboration.

    Question:

    What does "detailed, antique notes" mean here??

    Taka
    detailed = containing many details (particulars)
    notes = notation, writing
    antique = very old (Some teachers/professors lecture using the same notes they used 20 years ago! Now those are very old notes!)

    All the best,

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    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Thanks for the responce, Casiopea.

    You wrote:

    detailed = containing many details (particulars)
    notes = notation, writing
    antique = very old (Some teachers/professors lecture using the same notes they used 20 years ago! Now those are very old notes!)


    Actually, that's what I also thought at first.

    But if the interpretaion is correct, why do you think the "detailed, antique notes" are only for "lectures in the lecture hall", not for those on vidotape or audiotape?

    I would like your comments on this point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    .... why do you think the "detailed, antique notes" are only for "lectures in the lecture hall", not for those on vidotape or audiotape?

    I would like your comments on this point.
    "Lectures on videotape, on audiotape and--if delivered form detailed, antique notes--even in the lecture hall,...."

    The lecturer is reading the "Lectures" from "detailed, antique (antiquated) notes" while s/he is being recorded on video/audio.

    The lecturer is delivering (reading aloud) her/his lecture notes.

    All the best,

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    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    So, do you mean that "if delivered form detailed, antique notes" is a condition for "Lectures on videotape, on audiotape and even in the lecture hall"? Considering where "if delivered..." is inserted, I thought it was a condition only for "(lectures) even in the lecture hall". For example, when I say "Sushi, Tenpura, and--if I have to choose one more favorite food--Sukiyaki", then "if I have to choose one more favorite food" is a condition only for "Sukiyaki.

    Am I wrong?

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    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    I don't think that sentence says that detailed, antique notes or even notes of any kind are conditions for delivering lectures of any kind.

    :)

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    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Hi, RonBee. Thanks for the responce,

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I don't think that sentence says that detailed, antique notes or even notes of any kind are conditions for delivering lectures of any kind.

    :)
    If it's not conditions (or subjunctives), then what is it? What does "if..." modify there??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Hi, RonBee. Thanks for the responce,

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I don't think that sentence says that detailed, antique notes or even notes of any kind are conditions for delivering lectures of any kind.

    :)
    If it's not conditions (or subjunctives), then what is it? What does "if..." modify there??
    Here is the original sentence:
    • Lectures on videotape, on audiotape and--if delivered form [sic] detailed, antique notes--even in the lecture hall, come closer to the way knowledge is stored in books or on the Internet than to the manner in which it can be created and obtained through open questions and collaboration.

    It says that if the lectures are delivered from detailed, "antique" notes that those lectures come closer to the way knowledge is stored in books or on the Internet than the other way which is mentioned. The word if there doesn't really modify anything, but it introduces a clause that informs us that those lectures--for some reason--must be delivered from the notes mentioned. It doesn't say that lectures in general have to be delivered from notes, but it says the lectures they have in mind have to be delivered from notes.

    :)

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    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Let me ask this question grammatically.

    When there is a "A, B, and--(an inserted clause) --C" strucutre, are you saying that there are two possibilities: one is the case that the inserted clause is given to explain only C (like the Japanese food example that I've given), and the other is that the inserted clause is there to explain A, B, and C?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    So, do you mean that "if delivered form detailed, antique notes" is a condition for "Lectures on videotape, on audiotape and even in the lecture hall"? Considering where "if delivered..." is inserted, I thought it was a condition only for "(lectures) even in the lecture hall". For example, when I say "Sushi, Tenpura, and--if I have to choose one more favorite food--Sukiyaki", then "if I have to choose one more favorite food" is a condition only for "Sukiyaki.

    Am I wrong?
    All lectures = lectures recorded on videotape, lectures recorded on cassette tape, and lectures given (i.e. delivered) in a lecture hall.

    All lectures could be delivered (i.e. read) from 'detailed, antique notes'. People usually read from their "notes" when they are giving a lecture.

    Here's the point:

    Lectures, no matter the form, be it on TV, on cassette tape, or in a lecture hall, all lectures resemble books. That is, when you are reading a book, you cannot talk to the author. When you are listening to a cassette tape you cannot talk to the author, and when you are sitting in a lecture hall, you cannot talk to the lecturer while s/he is speaking. Lectures are not communication, per se. Communication is when you are able to share yout thoughts with someone through questions and collaboration of ideas (through speaking with one another).

    All the best,

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