Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 25 of 25
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Mar 2004
    • Posts: 1,074
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #21
    OK. I understand.

    Let me ask supposedly the final question.

    (A), (B) and (C) form the sentence proper. 'even' means, not only that but this, too. The underlined portion is not part of the sentence proper. It's added information which functions as an after thought. It modifies (A) and (B), but not (C). Since the dashes (--...--) represent an after thought and (C) is not mentioned before the after thought, (C) cannot be included in the after thought.
    Then, doesn't the example that I've given here ( "Sushi, Tenpura, and--if I have to choose one more favorite food--Sukiyaki") make any sence?

  1. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,570
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #22
    May I say one more thing about "antique notes"? The "antique" in that phrase does not mean that those notes are reliable or useful or meaningful. It only means that they are old. So, enough already about antique notes, please!

    (The word "antique" can be used humorously, although in this case the writer of the phrase "antique notes" seems to have been dead serious.)

    :)

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Mar 2004
    • Posts: 1,074
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #23
    To RonBee.

    Sorry to bother you. But my question is no longer about the definition of "detailed, antique notes" per se, but the grammatical function and semantics of an inserted phrase in general as in "A, B, and--(phrase)--C".

    Casiopea, I'm looking forward to your comments. Is my "favorite Japanese food" example wrong?

  2. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,570
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    OK. I understand.

    Let me ask supposedly the final question.

    (A), (B) and (C) form the sentence proper. 'even' means, not only that but this, too. The underlined portion is not part of the sentence proper. It's added information which functions as an after thought. It modifies (A) and (B), but not (C). Since the dashes (--...--) represent an after thought and (C) is not mentioned before the after thought, (C) cannot be included in the after thought.
    Then, doesn't the example that I've given here ( "Sushi, Tenpura, and--if I have to choose one more favorite food--Sukiyaki") make any sence?
    Yes, that does make sense.

    :wink:

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Mar 2004
    • Posts: 1,074
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #25
    Casiopea, I would like your final comments on the grammatical function and semantics of an inserted phrase in general as in "A, B, and--(phrase)--C".

    Are you saying that when there is a "A, B, and--(an inserted clause) --C" strucutre, there are two possibilities: one is the case that the inserted clause is given to refer only to C (like the Japanese food example that I've given), and the other is that the inserted clause is there to refer to A, B, and C?

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •