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  1. #1
    feryeng is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Peru
      • Current Location:
      • Peru
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    Jan 2007
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    Default Help Me Out To Find My Mistakes In This Paper

    HELLO TO EVERYBODY, THESE ARE MY CONCLUSIONS. CAN YOU APORT TO MY WORK GIVING A REVISION OF THIS, I KNOW IT HAS SOME MISTAKES, HELP ME OUT TO FIND WHERE?

    Conclusion

    The migration per se presents new challenges, and new life conditions in which the Peruvians must learn to battle. They must gradually strengthen their powers and their skills to comply with the living manners in the new place. However, it does not mean losing their traditional function and responsibilities; it is not easy but is important to develop the appropriate roles that correspond to each one of the family members. In the case of the Peruvians, the purposes of their plan could fully or partially agreed with the new atmosphere without damaging or negatively altering their function within the household. It is important not only to maintain their customs, attitudes, and beliefs, but also to redefine values, the perception of sense of life, and the constant identification of harmful situations for the sake of the family, which needs to be placed into the thought and reflection of most Peruvian parents.
    There are distinctively positive and negative effects in the process of immigration for the Peruvian families. First, the Peruvians in Japan could obtain a level of income that they can not in Peru. If they decide to return, which is the dream held by many, they could take home their savings to purchase real estate such as houses, cars and other durable consumer goods and accomplish their expectations of running their own business.
    Second, by living in Japan for many years, if they decide to amalgamate their own culture with the Japanese culture and language, they could also strengthen their visualization about their role in the host society, and specifically to find self-identification as a Japanese Peruvian looking for social distinction.
    On the other hand, I found that parents tend to maintain the Spanish as the primary language to communicate with family members and Peruvians community members. For them the acquisition of the Japanese language is not an imperative feature.
    In spite of the fact that some of them have been living in Japan for more than ten years, their unwillingness to learn the Japanese is originate for their vivid hope of future return which has been relegated for many years, when their original plan was to work in Japan for a shorter period of time, the enough that help them to save money and to quickly head to the homeland.
    However, this entire hypothetical atmosphere would fade with the passage of time. I base this affirmation in the results of my study, which indicate that Peruvians are going to be forced by the circumstances. This forced decision will finally originated the “va y viene” effect in which most senior Peruvians would be constantly switching their residence, visiting their kinship in the home country and at the same trying to stay as longer as possible with their loved ones in Japan.

    The study has shed light on how most families have a high tendency to settle in Japan permanently, because of the younger family members. The last decision whether to return to Peru or stay in Japan will be the final turning point.
    Nevertheless, this forced decision will to a great extent break the long dreams of returning to the home country, hoping to run their own business and spend long periods with family, relatives and friends in the future.
    In this sense, the gradually closing of the gender gap is a good element for the advancement of women’s opportunities in the society. At the same time, though their position as both wives and mothers implies having the responsibility to lead and to be the pillar in the family. Then, their insertion into the labor market and contributor for the economic acquisition adds one more function to the plurality of the context.
    Other focal point is the necessity of learning the Japanese language. For parents their children are the power of their lives, but this asseveration turns contradictory when parents can not communicate well with their own children who adopt Japanese as their first language. For the children, if parents do not have enough time for teaching them the mother language, then they would need to look for alternatives that can counter-balance the looseness of Spanish. As time goes by, and children grow up and their cultural preferences and tendencies lean towards the Japanese culture, the gap among family members will be extended. Family members would have to develop new communicational styles, based on unconventional forms of relationship.
    To conclude, if Peruvians hope to access to better job opportunities, the improvement of their social relations implies a consciousness of their isolated status framed only by themselves or with other Latin people. Furthermore a high improvement and skill in the Japanese Language is required to compete with wages of immigrants from different nationalities.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Help Me Out To Find My Mistakes In This Paper

    The migration per se presents new challenges, and new life conditions in which the Peruvians must learn to battle. They must gradually strengthen their powers and their skills to comply with the living manners in the new place. However, it<this> does not mean losing their traditional function<functions> and responsibilities; it is not easy but <it> is important to develop the appropriate roles that correspond to each one>delete< of the family members. In the case of the Peruvians, the purposes of their plan could fully or partially agreed<agree> with the new atmosphere without damaging or negatively altering their function within the household. It is important not only to maintain their customs, attitudes, and beliefs, but also to redefine values, the perception of sense of life, and the constant identification of harmful situations for the sake of the family, which needs to<should> be placed into>delete< in the thought<thoughts> and reflection<reflections> of most Peruvian parents.

    There are distinctively positive and negative effects in the process of immigration for the Peruvian families. First, the Peruvians in Japan could obtain a level of income that they can not<cannot obtain> in Peru. If they decide to return <to Peru>, which is the dream held by many, they could take home their savings to purchase real estate,
    such as houses,>delete< cars and other durable consumer goods, and <to > accomplish their expectations of running their own business.
    Second <Secondly>, by living in Japan for many years, if they decide to amalgamate their own culture with the Japanese culture and language, they could also strengthen their visualization about their role in the host society, and specifically to find self-identification as a Japanese Peruvian <Japanese-Peruvian> looking for social distinction.
    On the other hand, I found that parents tend to maintain the>delete< Spanish as the primary language to communicate with family members and Peruvians community members. For them<,> the acquisition of the Japanese language is not an imperative feature <of assimilation>.

    In spite of the fact that some of them have been living in Japan for more than ten years, their unwillingness to learn the Japanese is originate <<?? unfortunate ??>>, for their vivid hope of future return which has been relegated for many years, when their original plan was to work in Japan for a shorter period of time, the enough that help them{???} to save money and to quickly head to the homeland. {This entire sentence is too long, which makes it very confusing. I do not understand what it is you mean to say here. You should break this sentence down into three separate sentences, each containing its own thought/subject matter.}

    However, this entire hypothetical atmosphere would fade with the passage of time. I base this affirmation in the results of my study, which indicate that Peruvians are going to be forced by the circumstances {forced to do what?}. This forced decision will finally originated {the word 'will' denoted future tense, yet the words 'finally' and 'originate' are opposites of each other} the “va y viene” effect in which most senior Peruvians would be constantly switching their residence, visiting their kinship in the home country and at the same trying to stay as longer<long> as possible with their loved ones in Japan.

    The study has shed light on how most families have a high tendency to settle in Japan permanently, because of the younger family members. The last<final> decision whether to return to Peru or stay in Japan will be the final turning point {the final turning point in what?}.
    Nevertheless, this forced decision will<,> to a great extent<,> break the long<long-held> dreams of returning to the home country, hoping<the hope of> to>delete< run<running> their own business<businesses> and spend<spending> long periods<periods of time> with family, relatives and friends in the future.
    In this sense, the gradually<gradual> closing of the gender gap is a good element for the advancement of women’s opportunities in the society. At the same time, though their position as both wives and mothers implies having the responsibility to lead and to be the pillar in the family. Then, their<womens'> insertion into the labor market and contributor for the>delete< economic acquisition adds one more function to the plurality of the context.
    Other focal point is the necessity of learning the Japanese language. For parents<,> their children are the power of their lives, but this asseveration<observation> turns contradictory when parents can not<cannot> communicate well with their own children who adopt Japanese as their first language. For the children, if parents do not have enough time for teaching them the mother language, then they would<the parents> need to look for alternatives that can counter-balance the looseness <<?? looseness ??>> of Spanish. As time goes by, and children grow up and their cultural preferences and tendencies lean towards the Japanese culture, the gap among family members will be extended. Family members would have to develop new communicational<communication> styles, based on unconventional forms of relationship.

    To conclude, if Peruvians hope to <have > access to better job opportunities, the improvement of their social relations implies a consciousness of their isolated status framed only by themselves or with other Latin people. Furthermore<,> a high improvement and skill in the Japanese Language<language> is required to compete with wages of immigrants from different nationalities.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Default Re: Help Me Out To Find My Mistakes In This Paper

    The migration per se presents new challenges, and new life conditions in which the Peruvians must learn to battle. They must gradually strengthen their powers and their skills to comply with the living manners in the new place. However, this does not mean losing their traditional functions and responsibilities; it is not easy but it is important to develop the appropriate roles that correspond to each of the family members. In the case of the Peruvians, the purposes of their plan could fully or partially agree with the new atmosphere without damaging or negatively altering their function within the household. It is important not only to maintain their customs, attitudes, and beliefs, but also to redefine values, the perception of sense of life, and the constant identification of harmful situations for the sake of the family, which should be in the thoughts and reflections of most Peruvian parents.


    Secondly, by living in Japan for many years, if they decide to amalgamate their own culture with the Japanese culture and language, they could also strengthen their visualization about their role in the host society, and specifically to find self-identification as a Japanese-Peruvian looking for social distinction.

    On the other hand, I found that parents tend to maintain Spanish as the primary language to communicate with family members and Peruvians community members. For them, the acquisition of the Japanese language is not an imperative feature of assimilation.

    In spite of the fact that some Peruvians have been living in Japan for more than ten years, their unwillingness to learn the Japanese is unfortunate. Their vivid hope of future return has been relegated for many years, when their original plan was to work in Japan for only a short period of time, to save money and to quickly return to their homeland.

    However, this entire hypothetical atmosphere would fade with the passage of time. I base this affirmation in the results of my study, which indicate that Peruvians are going to be forced by the circumstances make a decision of staying in Japan or returning to Peru. This forced decision has finally geenerated the “va y viene” effect, in which most senior Peruvians constantly switch their residences, visiting their kinship in the home country and at the same trying to stay as long as possible with their loved ones in Japan.

    The study has shed light on how most families have a high tendency to settle in Japan permanently, because of the younger family members. The final decision whether to return to Peru or stay in Japan will be the final turning point in raising their children as Peruvians in Peru, as Peruvians in Japan, as Japanese in Peru, or as Japanese in Japan.

    Nevertheless, this forced decision will, to a great extent, break the long-held dreams of returning to the home country, the hope of running their own businesses and spending long periods of time with family, relatives and friends in the future.

    In this sense, the gradual closing of the gender gap is a good element for the advancement of women’s opportunities in the society. At the same time, though their position as both wives and mothers implies having the responsibility to lead and to be the pillar in the family. Then, womens' insertion into the labor market and contributor for economic acquisition adds one more function to the plurality of the context.

    Other focal point is the necessity of learning the Japanese language. For parents, their children are the power of their lives, but this observation turns contradictory when parents cannot communicate well with their own children who adopt Japanese as their first language. For the children, if parents do not have enough time for teaching them the mother language, then the parents need to look for alternatives that can counter-balance the inadequacies of Spanish in Japanese society. As time goes by, and as the children grow up and their cultural preferences and tendencies lean towards the Japanese culture, the gap among family members will be extended. Family members would have to develop new communication styles, based on unconventional forms of relationship.

    To conclude, if Peruvians hope to have access to better job opportunities, the improvement of their social relations implies a consciousness of their isolated status framed only by themselves or with other Latin people. Furthermore, a high improvement and skill in the Japanese language is required to compete with wages of immigrants from different nationalities.

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