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    #1

    a child and his...

    Which of these are correct:

    1-There is no feeling as strong as the love of a child for their mother.
    2-There is no feeling as strong as the love of a child for his mother.
    3-There is no feeling as strong as the love of a child for its mother.
    4-There is no feeling as strong as the love of a child for his or her mother.

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    #2

    Re: a child and his...

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    Which of these are correct:

    1-There is no feeling as strong as the love of a child for their mother.
    2-There is no feeling as strong as the love of a child for his mother.
    3-There is no feeling as strong as the love of a child for its mother.
    4-There is no feeling as strong as the love of a child for his or her mother.
    Hi Navi

    The best answer is 2.
    Sentence number 4 is also correct.
    The noun "child" can be naming a girl or a boy.
    Sentence number 1 : "child" is singular ; "their" is plural
    Sentence number 3 : "child" is a person; "its" is used for inanimate objects, animals, phenomena ,etc.


    Regards
    Last edited by Teia; 10-Jan-2007 at 20:34.


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    #3

    Re: a child and his...

    But "Their" can be used as a singular pronoun when you don't know the genre. So sentence number 1 would be correct as well. I'm pretty sure because UK's home office's website uses it and, indeed, look at this page:

    Singular they - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    (although I don't know if it sounds well in spoken english...)
    Last edited by willem; 10-Jan-2007 at 23:22.


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    #4

    Re: a child and his...

    Hi,
    I'd say its.

  1. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: a child and his...

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Hi,
    I'd say its.
    It's more convenient to say "it's", isn't it? But why?

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    #6

    Re: a child and his...

    Quote Originally Posted by willem View Post
    But "Their" can be used as a singular pronoun when you don't know the genre. So sentence number 1 would be correct as well. I'm pretty sure because UK's home office's website uses it and, indeed, look at this page:

    Singular they - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    (although I don't know if it sounds well in spoken english...)

    Hi

    "Their" cannot be used in this context . "Child" does not go with "their" in any case. Wikipedia dictionary refers to another part of speech [anyone] not to a noun in the singular as "child" is. Thus, sentence number 1 is grammatically incorrect.If the noun were "children" , then you could use "their" .

    Regards

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    #7

    Re: a child and his...

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Smith View Post
    It's more convenient to say "it's", isn't it? But why?

    Hi Harry
    "Its" [ not "it`s" = it is] is sometimes used with "baby" but not with "child"

    Its and It's - This is perhaps the most confusing aspect of apostrophe usage, but it's really quite easy to determine whether or not an apostrophe belongs:

    "It's" is a contraction; it's the shortened form of "it is."
    "Its" is a possessive pronoun. We use "its" to indicate possession by something nonhuman, or which has no defined male or female gender. [nevertheless,"its" cannot be used with "child"]

    For example:

    The dog wagged its tail. --The tail belongs to the dog.
    Once the can was bent, its lid wouldn't fit properly. --The lid belongs to the can.
    The baby wants its bottle. -- The bottle belongs to the baby.
    It's a beautiful day. -- It is a beautiful day.



    Regards
    Last edited by Teia; 11-Jan-2007 at 20:16.


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    #8

    Re: a child and his...

    Its can't be used with a child ??? Striking new to me.

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    #9

    Re: a child and his...

    i think this is the right :
    There is no feeling as strong as the love of a child for his or her mother.
    isnt it?

  2. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: a child and his...

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Hi Harry
    "Its" [ not "it`s" = it is] is sometimes used with "baby" but not with "child"

    Its and It's - This is perhaps the most confusing aspect of apostrophe usage, but it's really quite easy to determine whether or not an apostrophe belongs:

    "It's" is a contraction; it's the shortened form of "it is."
    "Its" is a possessive pronoun. We use "its" to indicate possession by something nonhuman, or which has no defined male or female gender. [nevertheless,"its" cannot be used with "child"]

    For example:

    The dog wagged its tail. --The tail belongs to the dog.
    Once the can was bent, its lid wouldn't fit properly. --The lid belongs to the can.
    The baby wants its bottle. -- The bottle belongs to the baby.
    It's a beautiful day. -- It is a beautiful day.



    Regards
    O.k I put ' by mistake. I maent "its" of course. I have explained this grammar to my students hundreds of times. Anyway, thanks.

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