Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    hela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,179
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default genitive VS compound noun

    Dear teachers,

    First, happy New Year to you all, and thank you for your kindness and dedication. I want to tell you that you've helped a lot throughout these years and I feel deeply endebted to you.

    My question for today is: Can I use the indefinite article with the genitive? Is it correct to say: "It's A five kilometres' walk" ?

    What's the difference between : "It's a five kilometres' walk" (genitive); and

    "It's a five-kilometre walk" (compound noun) ?

    What should I say:

    a) "There is two weeks delay" ; (with or without an apostrophe after "weeks" ?)

    b) "There is a two weeks delay" ; (with or without an apostrophe after "weeks" ?)

    c) "There is a two-week delay" ?

    Would you please give me a sentence with the phrase above?

    Many thanks,
    Hela
    Last edited by hela; 13-Jan-2007 at 18:04.

  2. #2
    svartnik is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: genitive VS compound noun


  3. #3
    svartnik is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: genitive VS compound noun

    My question for today is: Can I use the indefinite article with the genitive? Is it correct to say: "It's A five-kilometre(s') walk" ? NO

    "What's the difference between : "It's a five kilometres' walk" (genitive); and

    "It's a five-kilometre walk" (compound noun) ?" Nothing?


    b) "There is a two weeks' delay"
    c) "There is a two-week delay" ? --ok or a 2 weeks' delay

  4. #4
    hela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,179
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: genitive VS compound noun

    OK, let me recap. According to what you've told me and according to "owl" : "three days' journey = journey of three days"

    I can say:
    a) "It's a five kilometres' walk" or "It's a five-kilometre walk"
    b) "There's a three weeks' delay" or "There is a three-week delay"

    And each pair means the same, right?

  5. #5
    svartnik is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: genitive VS compound noun

    Quote Originally Posted by hela View Post
    OK, let me recap. According to what you've told me and according to "owl" : "three days' journey = journey of three days"

    I can say:
    a) "It's a five kilometres' walk" or "It's a five-kilometre walk"
    b) "There's a three weeks' delay" or "There is a three-week delay"

    And each pair means the same, right?
    Yes

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,335
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: genitive VS compound noun

    Quote Originally Posted by hela View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Can I use the indefinite article with the genitive? Is it correct to say: "It's A five kilometres' walk" ? No, that's wrong. five kilometres' walk or five-kilometre walk

    What's the difference between : "It's a five kilometres' walk" (genitive) wrong; and

    "It's a five-kilometre walk" (compound noun) ? right

    What should I say:

    a) "There is two weeks delay" ; (with or without an apostrophe after "weeks" ?) two weeks'

    b) "There is a two weeks delay" ; (with or without an apostrophe after "weeks" ?) wrong

    c) "There is a two-week delay" ? right

    Would you please give me a sentence with the phrase above?

    Many thanks,
    Hela
    Hi, Hela,
    I'm going to have a two-week holiday.= I'm going to have two weeks' holiday.
    If you have the plural, you need an apostrophe and no article.

    Regards.

  7. #7
    hela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,179
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: genitive VS compound noun

    Good morning,

    Would you say "I went for a three days' journey" or "I went for three days' journey"? Now if we can say neither in which types of sentences can I use the possessive with units of measurement? Would you please give me more examples?

    All the best,
    Hela
    Last edited by hela; 15-Jan-2007 at 09:20.

  8. #8
    Mister Micawber's Avatar
    Mister Micawber is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,855
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: genitive VS compound noun

    .
    Huddleston & Pullum's CGEL (16.3) states that the measure genitive measures 'just temporal length or value', thus eliminating from consideration your 'five kilometer's walk' and leaving only:

    It's a five-kilometre walk.

    For the temporal cases, I would use:

    There is a two-week delay in delivery.
    There is/are two week's delay in delivery.

    Cf: Three days' pay is/are owed you. There may be a conceptual choice between the multiple days/weeks and the single amount of money/delay, but I don't believe we would ever choose (X/?) 'A three days' pay is owed you'. I feel that the number greater than one is just too notionally discordant with the singular indefinite article. CGEL slyly avoids consideration of this case, however.
    .

  9. #9
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    2,585
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: genitive VS compound noun

    Quote Originally Posted by hela View Post
    Good morning,

    Would you say "I went for a three days' journey" or "I went for three days' journey"? Now if we can say neither in which types of sentences can I use the possessive with units of measurement? Would you please give me more examples?
    I would agree with MM:

    1. ?It's a five miles' walk.
    2. It's a five-mile walk.

    I would find #1 a little strange too; but #2 is fine (though I would take it as "compound adjective + noun", rather than a compound noun).

    3. I went on a three-day journey. [not "for"]
    4. I went on a three days' journey.
    5. *I went on three days' journey.

    #3 is fine; #4 doesn't seem objectionable to me, though it might sound old-fashioned in some contexts. #5 doesn't seem to work; but

    6. After three days' walking, I found myself in the rose-red city.

    is fine.

    All the best,

    MrP

    PS: Would you also find "a three weeks' bonus" odd, Mister M?

  10. #10
    Mister Micawber's Avatar
    Mister Micawber is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,855
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: genitive VS compound noun

    .
    Would you also find "a three weeks' bonus" odd, Mister M?
    Only when I think about it, MrP.

    Interestingly, 'a further three weeks' bonus' rests easier with me.
    .

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Compound Noun
    By TRANG in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Jan-2007, 12:25
  2. compound noun or adjectif
    By Mastouri in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Feb-2006, 11:50
  3. compound noun
    By notmyname216 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Dec-2004, 11:48
  4. Could not find the proper word or compound noun
    By NewHope in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 24-Aug-2004, 18:14
  5. Dear Mikenewyork, I'm still confused.
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-May-2004, 19:47

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •