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Thread: rush/hurry

  1. #1
    thru is offline Member
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    rush/hurry

    Hi,

    Are the two sentences the same meaning? That is, is there any difference between 'rush' and 'hurry' here?
    1.I rushed up the stairs.
    2.I hurried up the stairs.
    Thank you!

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Re: rush/hurry

    No difference.

    ~R

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    Harry Smith's Avatar
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    Re: rush/hurry

    Quote Originally Posted by thru View Post
    Hi,

    Are the two sentences the same meaning? That is, is there any difference between 'rush' and 'hurry' here?
    1.I rushed up the stairs.
    2.I hurried up the stairs.
    Thank you!
    When you "rush" you move faster, I think.

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    thru is offline Member
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    Re: rush/hurry

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Smith View Post
    When you "rush" you move faster, I think.
    Hi, harry
    I think 'hurry' also means "move faster", too. They seem to be the same meaning to me.
    Thank you for your reply.

  5. #5
    Harry Smith's Avatar
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    Re: rush/hurry

    Quote Originally Posted by thru View Post
    Hi, harry
    I think 'hurry' also means "move faster", too. They seem to be the same meaning to me.
    Thank you for your reply.
    Yes, of course. They are very near in meaning.

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    Re: rush/hurry

    The sentences, at first do indeed seem to be synonymous.
    However, on closer examination it seems that "rush" has a nuance of haste and carelessness, whereas "hurry" seems only to carry the nuance of speed.

  7. #7
    thru is offline Member
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    Re: rush/hurry

    Quote Originally Posted by Niall View Post
    The sentences, at first do indeed seem to be synonymous.
    However, on closer examination it seems that "rush" has a nuance of haste and carelessness, whereas "hurry" seems only to carry the nuance of speed.
    Thank you, Niall for your comment. 'hurry' and 'rush' are slightly different here. How about in different contexts? For example,
    1.There's no need to hurry/rush. We've got
    plenty of time.
    2.I hate having to hurry/rush a meal.
    3.She doesn't want to be hurried/rushed into
    making a decision.
    Is there any difference between 'rush' and 'hurry' in the contexts above?
    Last edited by thru; 17-Jan-2007 at 19:32.

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    Re: rush/hurry

    In those contexts there is no difference at all. :)

  9. #9
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    Re: rush/hurry

    Quote Originally Posted by thru View Post
    ...
    2. I hate having to hurry/rush a meal.
    ...
    Quote Originally Posted by Niall View Post
    In those contexts there is no difference at all. :)
    But as Niall said, rush has connotations of haste/carelessness, so if there's an implied judgement, you have to use 'rush':

    My Auntie Nellie always told me not to rush my food.
    My father said the secret of making a good dovetail joint was not to rush the sawing.


    b
    Last edited by BobK; 16-Jan-2007 at 18:59.

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    Re: rush/hurry

    You would hurry with your meal, without spilling any.

    And you would rush your food down and get indigestion

    So rush does give a sense of reckless haste.

    I don't think you can hurry headlong into something!

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