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Thread: stand up for

  1. #1
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    stand up for

    He stands up for everyone.

    Am I correct to think that the person mentioned in the sentence is brave enough to fight for them? If not, what does it mean? If correct, are there other interpretations? How about the preposition used? Is it correct? Or, should I use "to" instead.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Re: stand up for

    Quote Originally Posted by hlbert03 View Post
    He stands up for everyone.

    Am I correct to think that the person mentioned in the sentence is brave enough to fight for them? If not, what does it mean? If correct, are there other interpretations? How about the preposition used? Is it correct? Or, should I use "to" instead.

    Thanks.
    Don't use 'to'; that changes the meaning completely.

    He stood up for the farmers, who didn't want to sell their land to the property developers. [He took the farmers' side.]

    But

    He stood up to the property developers, who wanted to buy the farmers' land.
    [He resisted the property developers.]

    b

    PS

    As for other meanings, I can only think of the obvious physical one:

    He's a real gentlemen - he always stands up for ladies on the bus.
    (He's not championing their cause; he's just offering them his seat.)
    Last edited by BobK; 17-Jan-2007 at 12:54. Reason: Added PS

  3. #3
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    Re: stand up for

    Right. to stand up for something or someone means to defend or support something or someone.

  4. #4
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    Re: stand up for

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Don't use 'to'; that changes the meaning completely.

    He stood up for the farmers, who didn't want to sell their land to the property developers. [He took the farmers' side.]

    But

    He stood up to the property developers, who wanted to buy the farmers' land.
    [He resisted the property developers.]

    b

    PS

    As for other meanings, I can only think of the obvious physical one:

    He's a real gentlemen - he always stands up for ladies on the bus.
    (He's not championing their cause; he's just offering them his seat.)


    So, "stand up to" means to resist from something or someone?

  5. #5
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    Re: stand up for



    b

  6. #6
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    Re: stand up for

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post


    b

    Thank you.

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