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  1. #1
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    Default names of forms in functions of expectation and surprise

    Hi,

    I'm preparing a lesson on functions for tomorrow as part of my CELTA course, and I'm struggling with identifying/analysing the following forms:

    He passed his test, as you might expect.

    principal clause + , + subordinate clause introduced by as?


    He kept going and, inevitably he ran out of petrol.

    1st clause + and + , + adverb + 2nd clause?


    I was left for my train and, to my surprise, it had not left.

    1st clause + and + , + adverbial clause + , + 2nd clause


    He had a good job but, for some reason, he didnít to leave.

    1st clause + but + , + adverbial clause + , + 2nd clause


    Is that correct? I've been wrecking my head over this one and am still unsure how to label those forms correctly.


    I'd be really greatful if someone could confirm/correct,

    Cedric

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: names of forms in functions of expectation and surprise

    to my surprise- this is an adverb phrase or adverbial, not an adverb clause- an adverb clause would be something like 'before she arrived'

    I also wonder about 'inevitably'- I'd put a comma after it as it seems to me to be a sentence adverb modifying all of the clause.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: names of forms in functions of expectation and surprise

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    to my surprise- this is an adverb phrase or adverbial, not an adverb clause- an adverb clause would be something like 'before she arrived'

    I also wonder about 'inevitably'- I'd put a comma after it as it seems to me to be a sentence adverb modifying all of the clause.
    Thanks for that Tdol, much appreciated!

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: names of forms in functions of expectation and surprise

    Tdol's dealt with this, but I noticed one (irrelevant) slip:
    I've been wrecking my head over this one....
    - nearly though! "I've been racking my brain[s] over this." Maybe you know this really - doing the CELTA can have unusual side-effects!

    b

  5. #5
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    Default Re: names of forms in functions of expectation and surprise

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Tdol's dealt with this, but I noticed one (irrelevant) slip:
    - nearly though! "I've been racking my brain[s] over this." Maybe you know this really - doing the CELTA can have unusual side-effects!

    b
    oops, nice one bob, obviously not done my phonetic analysis for this one

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: names of forms in functions of expectation and surprise

    I think you were probably right the first time.

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