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    • Join Date: Dec 2006
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    #1

    I don't understand a phrase.

    I am reading a novel, Pelican Brief. Would you read and let me know what the underlined mean?
    --------------------
    She would hide there for a year and hope that crime would be solved and the bad guys put away. But it was a dream. The quickest route to justice ran smack through her. She knew more than anyone. The Fibbies had circled close, then backed off, and were now chasing who knows who.

    Thank you very much.

  1. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Mar 2006
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    #2

    Re: I don't understand a phrase.

    It means know one knows who they are now chasing, or at least the person talking has no idea who might know who they are chasing. In this case it is 'she' doesn't know who the 'fibbies' (I think that might be a derogatory name for the FBI) are chasing and she doesn't know who might know who they are chasing.

    'Who knows where' is often used to indicate know one knows where

    I hope that makes sense, I've just read it and it's a bit gobbledygooky


    • Join Date: May 2006
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    #3

    Re: I don't understand a phrase.

    Hi,
    I think it would be clearer with who knows whom. It means they were chasing some wrong people that were not connected with the crime.

    Cheers


    • Join Date: May 2006
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    #4

    Re: I don't understand a phrase.

    Oh, I am late, sorry.

  2. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
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    #5

    Re: I don't understand a phrase.

    The expressions 'who knows what', 'who knows when', 'who knows how' and 'who knows why' (etc.) can be used similarly. In other words, to say that nobody really knows what/when/how/why.

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