Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    hela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Ireland / island

    Dear teachers,

    In Br English would the words "Ireland" and "island" be pronounced the same or is there a slight difference?
    Would you say /ailənd/ for both, or /ailənd/ for "island" and /aiələnd/ for "Ireland" ?
    Are there two ways of pronouncing "debris", /deibri/ and /dɛbri/ ? Is the final /i/ short or long?

    All the best,
    Hela
    Last edited by hela; 22-Jan-2007 at 07:06.

  2. #2
    curmudgeon's Avatar
    curmudgeon is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,658
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ireland / island

    Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source
    is·land /ˈaɪlənd/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[ahy-luhnd] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation –noun A tract of land completely surrounded by water, and not large enough to be called a continent.

    Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source Ire·land /ˈaɪərlənd/Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[ahyuhr-luhnd]Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation–noun Republic of. Formerly, Irish Free State (1922–37), Eire (1937–49). a republic occupying most of the island of Ireland. 3,555,500; 27,137 sq. mi. (70,285 sq. km). Capital: Dublin. Irish, Eire.

    Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source
    de·bris /dəˈbri, ˈdeɪbri or, especially Brit., ˈdɛbri/Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[duh-bree, dey-bree or, especially Brit., deb-ree]Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation–noun The remains of anything broken down or destroyed; ruins; rubble: the debris of buildings after an air raid.

  3. #3
    hela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ireland / island

    Good morning Curmudgeon,

    Thank you for your mail but I couldn't hear the pronunciation of the words on "Dictionary.com Unabridged"; I need to be a subscriber to do that, don't I?

    Have a nice day

  4. #4
    curmudgeon's Avatar
    curmudgeon is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,658
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ireland / island

    It appears that you do...I didn't know that!. I'll see if I can find another site.

  5. #5
    curmudgeon's Avatar
    curmudgeon is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,658
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ireland / island

    Try this...
    Go to 'control panel' on your pc. Click on 'Speech'. Click on 'Text to Speech' Tab. Type in- Ireland, Island then click preview voice. You should be able to detect the difference. You can slow down the speech to make it clearer. It's not perfect, it's a computer generated 'voice' but it might help.

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    41,618
    Post Thanks / Like

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,332
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ireland / island

    Quote Originally Posted by hela View Post
    Dear teachers,

    In Br English would the words "Ireland" and "island" be pronounced the same or is there a slight difference?
    Would you say /ailənd/ for both, or /ailənd/ for "island" and /aiələnd/ for "Ireland" ?
    Are there two ways of pronouncing "debris", /deibri/ and /dɛbri/ ? Is the final /i/ short or long?

    All the best,
    Hela
    Your transcriptions of island/Ireland are fine hela. The first vowel sound of Ireland is a triphthong (with no trace of an /r/ sound in RBP - I tried curmudgeon's trick, and Microsoft Sam gives it rather an AmE burr).

    The final vowel in /'debri:/ is long, even in the AmE pronunciation (/də'bri:/).

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 22-Jan-2007 at 16:56. Reason: Added last line.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    22
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ireland / island

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post

    The final vowel in /'debri:/ is long, even in the AmE pronunciation (/də'bri:/).

    b
    American English doesn't have phonemic length distinction. I would pronoucne "debris" as [dəbri].

  9. #9
    hela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ireland / island

    Thanks to everyone
    Thanks Bob for confirming my transcriptions. It's strange that Collins Dict. gives the sound /i/ in "debris" as short while I thought that it could rather be long (which you confirmed) since the word comes from French. Isn't it the same for "chassis"? Pronounced "sh" and not "tch" with a long /i/ at the end?

    Have a nice day!

  10. #10
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,332
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ireland / island

    Quote Originally Posted by Englishuser View Post
    American English doesn't have phonemic length distinction. I would pronoucne "debris" as [dəbri].
    For my phonemic transcriptions I use the broad transcription system used in the OUP wallcharts used in every school I've ever taught in (not many, worst luck! ). All I meant when I used the symbol /i:/ was that it was not /ı/.

    Quote Originally Posted by hela View Post
    Thanks to everyone
    Thanks Bob for confirming my transcriptions. It's strange that Collins Dict. gives the sound /i/ in "debris" as short while I thought that it could rather be long (which you confirmed) since the word comes from French. Isn't it the same for "chassis"? Pronounced "sh" and not "tch" with a long /i/ at the end?

    Have a nice day!
    (re debris); and re chassis, that's right for BE. I believe AmE puts an /ıs/ at the end of chassis, and maybe also an initial /t/ in some dialects - I'm not the man to ask in this regard.

    b

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk