Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Ache, sore.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Ache, sore.

    Hello everybody and thanks in advance for your answers. It is usual to use "ache" to say: headache, backache, toothache, stomachache, etc. Is it possible to use it with other parts of the body? Can I say ankleache or elbowache? And what about "sore"; I have a sore throat is usual, in the same way, can I use it with other parts? I have a sore head, leg, etc.

  2. #2
    Teia is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,881
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ache, sore.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ciciey View Post
    Hello everybody and thanks in advance for your answers. It is usual to use "ache" to say: headache, backache, toothache, stomachache, etc. Is it possible to use it with other parts of the body? Can I say ankleache or elbowache? And what about "sore"; I have a sore throat is usual, in the same way, can I use it with other parts? I have a sore head, leg, etc.
    Hi

    ache -a continuous,dull pain :ache - The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English - HighBeam Research

    Yes, you can use the adjective "sore" with other parts of the body.

    Sore
    –adjective 1. physically painful or sensitive, as a wound, hurt, or diseased part: a sore arm.
    2. suffering bodily pain from wounds, bruises, etc., as a person: He is sore because of all that exercise.
    3. suffering mental pain; grieved, distressed, or sorrowful: to be sore at heart.
    4. causing great mental pain, distress, or sorrow: a sore bereavement.
    5. causing very great suffering, misery, hardship, etc.: sore need.
    6. Informal. annoyed; irritated; offended; angered: He was sore because he had to wait.
    7. causing annoyance or irritation: a sore subject.
    –noun 8. a sore spot or place on the body.
    9. a source or cause of grief, distress, irritation, etc.
    10.painful to touch; tender

    Feeling physical pain; hurting: sore all over.
    Causing misery, sorrow, or distress; grievous: in sore need.
    Causing embarrassment or irritation: a sore subject.
    Full of distress; sorrowful.

    noun
    An open skin lesion, wound, or ulcer.
    A source of pain, distress, or irritation.


    Example: My leg is very sore; I have a sore leg.

    Source : sore - Definitions from Dictionary.com

    Regards
    Last edited by Teia; 21-Jan-2007 at 16:37.

  3. #3
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ache, sore.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ciciey View Post
    Hello everybody and thanks in advance for your answers. It is usual to use "ache" to say: headache, backache, toothache, stomachache, etc. Is it possible to use it with other parts of the body? Can I say ankleache or elbowache? And what about "sore"; I have a sore throat is usual, in the same way, can I use it with other parts? I have a sore head, leg, etc.
    Instead of an "elbowache," you'd say "my elbow aches." (As mine does right now. Ow.) If you'd been lifting heavy boxes yesterday, and today your elbow hurts when you move it a certain way, you'd say "my elbow is sore." If you have arthritis or some other condition and your elbow hurts no matter what you do, then you'd say "my elbow aches."

  4. #4
    riverkid is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,064
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ache, sore.

    It seems that the body parts that take '___ache' are those that have aches/commonly ache for the majority of the population.

    '____ache'; ear/head/back/stomach/tooth/etc

    No 'ache': eye/nose/lip/elbow/

    'sore' seems to be more transitory, as noted by Ouisch. 'sore' also seems to be more locally intense,"painful to touch; tender", as noted by the definition given by Teia. Perhaps this is why we have 'sore throats' because when we do, anything touching them, such as liquids, make them 'painful to the touch'.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ache, sore.

    Where were you before, friends? Thanks a lot again, your answers are very helpful for me. Ouisch, take care of your elbow. See you by the next question. Bye.

  6. #6
    Volcano1985's Avatar
    Volcano1985 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    872
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ache, sore.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ciciey View Post
    Hello everybody and thanks in advance for your answers. It is usual to use "ache" to say: headache, backache, toothache, stomachache, etc. Is it possible to use it with other parts of the body? Can I say ankleache or elbowache? And what about "sore"; I have a sore throat is usual, in the same way, can I use it with other parts? I have a sore head, leg, etc.
    It is feeling difference

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,341
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Ache, sore.

    There are also some idiomatic usages:

    heartache - nothing to do with chest pains: regret, nostalgia, a painful memory, emotional upset
    like a bear with a sore head - easily annoyed
    a sight for sore eyes - a welcome sight
    footsore - perhaps idiomatic; a footsore pilgrim's feet do hurt, but they don't necessarily have sores

    b

Similar Threads

  1. Ache Vs Pain
    By knicola in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-Nov-2006, 20:31
  2. I have a sore eye. = I have an eyesore. ????
    By sula54 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Aug-2005, 08:23
  3. something is a sight for sore eyes
    By Laurie K in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Jul-2005, 14:32
  4. to hurt vs. to ache
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 18-Apr-2005, 03:17
  5. Ache / pain / hurt / sore
    By Dany in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 14-Nov-2004, 20:38

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk