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Thread: co-textuality

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    co-textuality

    I'm reqesting to know the importance of Co-textuality in Discourse Analysis.
    Also the importance of Context of situation in Discourse Analysis.

  2. #2
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Re: co-textuality

    Quote Originally Posted by Christinah
    I'm reqesting to know the importance of Co-textuality in Discourse Analysis.
    Also the importance of Context of situation in Discourse Analysis.
    They are both very important to discourse analysts. The context is the setting that something occurs in. This can help to decipher the meaning of words or statements that can have more than one meaning. Cotext refers to the words or text that come before or after a certain passage. This can obviously influence the understanding of the text in question.

    Does that help?

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    RonBee's Avatar
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    Re: co-textuality

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by Christinah
    I'm reqesting to know the importance of Co-textuality in Discourse Analysis.
    Also the importance of Context of situation in Discourse Analysis.
    They are both very important to discourse analysts. The context is the setting that something occurs in. This can help to decipher the meaning of words or statements that can have more than one meaning. Cotext refers to the words or text that come before or after a certain passage. This can obviously influence the understanding of the text in question.

    Does that help?
    So what is the difference between cotext and context?

    :?

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Context is broader- cotext is the immediate surroundings of a word.

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    It seems to me that cotext mostly belongs in academia. The definition of cotext is how I usually define context.

    :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    It seems to me that cotext mostly belongs in academia. The definition of cotext is how I usually define context.

    :)
    Agreed. :) Cotext and context are fuzzy. "The term "cotext" refers to the text that surrounds a passage, i.e. the words or sentences coming before and after it. [Note,] Cotext is the textual context of a text.)" Huh? Or as Canadians would say, "Eh?"

    Here's something sweet: The statement "There is no God" occurs 18 times in the Bible (e.g. Psalms 14:1 The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.) Cotext: The fool hath said in his heart

    :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    It seems to me that cotext mostly belongs in academia. The definition of cotext is how I usually define context.

    :)
    Agreed. :) Cotext and context are fuzzy. "The term "cotext" refers to the text that surrounds a passage, i.e. the words or sentences coming before and after it. [Note,] Cotext is the textual context of a text.)" Huh? Or as Canadians would say, "Eh?"

    Here's something sweet: The statement "There is no God" occurs 18 times in the Bible (e.g. Psalms 14:1 The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.) Cotext: The fool hath said in his heart

    :)
    "Huh?" was exactly my reaction.

    :wink:

    Do you have the Bible memorized? How do you come up with that stuff?

    :wink:

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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    It seems to me that cotext mostly belongs in academia. The definition of cotext is how I usually define context.

    :)
    Agreed. :) Cotext and context are fuzzy. "The term "cotext" refers to the text that surrounds a passage, i.e. the words or sentences coming before and after it. [Note,] Cotext is the textual context of a text.)" Huh? Or as Canadians would say, "Eh?"

    Here's something sweet: The statement "There is no God" occurs 18 times in the Bible (e.g. Psalms 14:1 The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.) Cotext: The fool hath said in his heart

    :)
    "Huh?" was exactly my reaction.

    :wink:

    Do you have the Bible memorized? How do you come up with that stuff?

    :wink:
    It's all in the cotext, babe. :)

    Actually, I have never read the Bible--well, not the whole thing; there are way too many 'begets' to get through, and those are like on page 2 or other. And, moreover, when I got to the part where it said Adam got to name all the animals, I had to close the book. Why him? That's just blatant favo(u)ritism. :D Moreover, what's with the rib? Was it a spare or what? :) Talk about a funny bone. :) I prefer Charlie somebody or other's version of the bible: When Adam saw Eve for the first time he said, "Whoa, man!", and hence the term "woman". 8)

    That there are "There is no God" statements in the Bible is often used to explain the importance of 'cotext'. There's also Psalm 10:4 "God was not in his right thoughts." Ahem, whatcha talkin' 'bout Willis??

    All the best,

  9. #9
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    Hey, Adam was first, wasn't he? Seniority has its privileges.

    :wink:

    One might say that God, being a he, was prejudiced towards the male of the species. However, Eve was supposed to be an equal partner (a help-meet). At least, that is the case according to something I read some time or other.

    :wink:

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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Hey, Adam was first, wasn't he? Seniority has its privileges.

    :wink:

    One might say that God, being a he, was prejudiced towards the male of the species. However, Eve was supposed to be an equal partner (a help-meet). At least, that is the case according to something I read some time or other.

    :wink:
    Yeah seniority has its privileges, but, you gotta admit that Adam didn't have language per se, so how was it that he was able to name all those animals? :D

    After the chore of grunting out all those animal names, Adam was lonely, so God put him to sleep, and while he slept, took one of Adam's ribs and made Eve as a playmate for Adam. It wasn't until Eve tempted Adam into eating the 'forbidden fruit (figurative meaning intended)' that Adam and his now conjugal-mate were banished from the Garden of Eden. Eve was considered as much of an equal partner as was the rib from which she was formed. :)

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