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  1. #1
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    Default need help with a phrase.

    is it : It slips off her arm.
    or

    It slips off of her arm.

    or it could be: It sliped off her arm.

    or : It sliped off of her arm.

    basicaly a item that slips off of a persons arm. like : The watch slipped off her arm.

  2. #2
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: need help with a phrase.

    Hello Market

    1. It slips off her arm.
    2. It slipped off her arm.

    Both #1 and #2 are fine in any kind of English.

    3. It slips off of her arm.
    4. It slipped off of her arm.

    "Off of" on the other hand is a disputed usage. Some people dislike it, on the grounds that the "of" is superfluous; some people don't mind it, and believe that the "of" gives a greater sense of "off-ness" (i.e. that it intensifies the expression).

    For my part, I don't mind it; but in contexts where your grammar may be subject to detailed scrutiny (e.g. in exams, interviews, job applications, etc.), it's probably better to avoid it.

    All the best,

    MrP

  3. #3
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    Default Re: need help with a phrase.

    thanks.
    I have another question.

    if i say: A beautiful entrance with two bay windows on both sides. (that would be four windows right?)

    compared to : A beautiful entrance with bays windows on both sides.

    let me make a better example.
    Heading towards the archway, I saw two statues on both sides.(that would be four, correct?)

    and: Heading towards the archway, I saw a statue on both sides.(that would be two, correct?)
    Last edited by Tdol; 23-Jan-2007 at 04:57.

  4. #4
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: need help with a phrase.

    Quote Originally Posted by market View Post
    thanks.
    I have another question.

    if i say: A beautiful entrance with two bay windows on both sides. (that would be four windows right?)

    compared to : A beautiful entrance with bay windows on both sides.

    let me make a better example.
    Heading towards the archway, I saw two statues on both sides.(that would be four, correct?)

    and: Heading towards the archway, I saw a statue on both sides.(that would be two, correct?)
    Though it would be better to say "a bay window on each side" and "a statue on each side"

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