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Thread: rise/raise

  1. Hong Kong Chinese
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    #1

    rise/raise

    I am going to give him a rise.
    I am going to give him a raise.
    My translation friend told me that British people liked to use ‘rise’. Is he correct?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: rise/raise

    Quote Originally Posted by Hong Kong Chinese
    I am going to give him a rise.
    I am going to give him a raise.
    My translation friend told me that British people liked to use ‘rise’. Is he correct?
    I don't think the Brits would use it in that context. :wink:

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    #3
    Yes, I'd say that you are correct there (in general).

    We do use both, but I would guess that 'rise' is more common.
    I'm not a teacher, so please consider any advice I give in that context.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Red5
    Yes, I'd say that you are correct there (in general).

    We do use both, but I would guess that 'rise' is more common.
    Oops! I am again surprised by our differences.

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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by Red5
    Yes, I'd say that you are correct there (in general).

    We do use both, but I would guess that 'rise' is more common.
    Oops! I am again surprised by our differences.
    We use 'rise', but almost always in combination with 'pay'.

    EG:

    I want a pay rise.

    How much was your pay rise?

    However, we also use raise, but without the word 'pay'

    I'm looking for (I want) a raise.

    I'd love to here if others here agree with me or not.
    I'm not a teacher, so please consider any advice I give in that context.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Red5
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by Red5
    Yes, I'd say that you are correct there (in general).

    We do use both, but I would guess that 'rise' is more common.
    Oops! I am again surprised by our differences.
    We use 'rise', but almost always in combination with 'pay'.

    EG:

    I want a pay rise.

    How much was your pay rise?

    However, we also use raise, but without the word 'pay'

    I'm looking for (I want) a raise.

    I'd love to here if others here agree with me or not.
    Thanks. I'm always happy to learn more about BE. :wink:

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    #7
    In AE we might seek a raise in pay, but I don't think rise is used that way here (USA).

    :)

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    In AE we might seek a raise in pay, but I don't think rise is used that way here (USA).

    :)
    On these forums, I have run across more differences between AE and BE than I ever thought to be in existence.

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    #9
    We do use both in BE. I must say, being in constant communication with Americans has shown me just how many differences there are. Most textbooks confine themselves to a list of words like tap\faucet, but there are so many others. Fortunately, few impede communication.

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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    We do use both in BE. I must say, being in constant communication with Americans has shown me just how many differences there are. Most textbooks confine themselves to a list of words like tap\faucet, but there are so many others. Fortunately, few impede communication.
    I agree. I have seen many lists, but they seem very inadequate to me now. :wink:

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