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  1. #1
    Ju is offline Senior Member
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    Red face exchange of money , greeting

    1) I want to exchange my $10 banknote into the coins of $1, $2?
    Shall I say:
    • May I break this $10 banknote into the coins of $1 and $2?

    2) I want to exchange my $100 banknote into the banknotes of $10, $20?
    Shall I say:
    • May I break this $100 banknote into the banknotes of $10 and $20?
    3) Any other better ways to express the aboved?

    4) Does "exchange money" only describe for exchange the currency of
    money but not from banknotes to coins vv?

    ************************************************** *****
    For the official broadcast, like on TV, radio...what are the time frame for greeting :
    1. good morning
    2. good afternoon
    3. good evening
    May I guess :

    good morning : 0000 - 1159
    good afternoon : 1200 - 1859
    good evening : 1900 - 2359

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: exchange of money , greeting

    The sentences you posted are perfectly fine, but it would be more common to just tell the clerk: "I'd like to get change for this hundred."
    He or she will then usually ask you, "How do you want that?"
    And you'd reply, "Tens and twenties." (You can specifiy how many of each, saying "Two twenties and the rest in tens," or whatever you prefer.)

    -or-

    "May I get change for this ten?"
    NOTE: In Canada, you can ask for $1 and $2 coins. However, in the US, dollar coins are not very widely used, and we don't have $2 coins. So, in the US, you would say:
    "May I get ten singles for this, please?"
    And you would get ten $1 bills in exchange.

    "Good morning" is usually said until 12 noon.
    "Good afternoon" until 6:00PM (1800)
    "Good evening" until 12 midnight (2400)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: exchange of money , greeting

    Good Evening can come in earlier in the Winter and later in the Summer.

    Good Night is only ever used in farewell as you know but it sounds funny saying good evening good morning and goodnight to people within a short timeframe in the evening (sic).

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: exchange of money , greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    ...
    "Good morning" is usually said until 12 noon.
    "Good afternoon" until 6:00PM (1800)
    "Good evening" until 12 midnight (2400)
    I agree, generally, but with Mordant's rider about the early onset of evening. Even as far south as I am (about the latitude of London), at this time of year it gets dark shortly after 1600 - so people can say 'Good evening' as early as 1700. Also, the morning can be quite flexible - 'Good morning' is sometimes used any time before the mid-day meal.

    b

  5. #5
    Ju is offline Senior Member
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    Red face Re: exchange of money , greeting

    [quote=Ouisch;147762]The sentences you posted are perfectly fine, but it would be more common to just tell the clerk: "I'd like to get change for this hundred."
    He or she will then usually ask you, "How do you want that?"
    And you'd reply, "Tens and twenties." (You can specifiy how many of each, saying "Two twenties and the rest in tens," or whatever you prefer.)

    -or-

    "May I get change for this ten?"
    NOTE: In Canada, you can ask for $1 and $2 coins. However, in the US, dollar coins are not very widely used, and we don't have $2 coins. So, in the US, you would say:
    "May I get ten singles for this, please?"
    And you would get ten $1 bills in exchange.

    ************************************************** ******
    Quisch,

    Why do you ask for ten singles but given ten $1 bills in exchange? Does singles stand for bills here?
    Is bill more commonly used than banknote? What are their differences?

    Thanks

  6. #6
    Ju is offline Senior Member
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    Red face Re: exchange of money , greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I agree, generally, but with Mordant's rider about the early onset of evening. Even as far south as I am (about the latitude of London), at this time of year it gets dark shortly after 1600 - so people can say 'Good evening' as early as 1700. Also, the morning can be quite flexible - 'Good morning' is sometimes used any time before the mid-day meal.

    b
    ************************************************** *******
    Bobk,

    Shall we simply bid good evening as soon as it gets dark on the day regardless where we are?

    Thanks.

  7. #7
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: exchange of money , greeting

    [QUOTE=Ju;148532]
    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    The sentences you posted are perfectly fine, but it would be more common to just tell the clerk: "I'd like to get change for this hundred."
    He or she will then usually ask you, "How do you want that?"
    And you'd reply, "Tens and twenties." (You can specifiy how many of each, saying "Two twenties and the rest in tens," or whatever you prefer.)

    -or-

    "May I get change for this ten?"
    NOTE: In Canada, you can ask for $1 and $2 coins. However, in the US, dollar coins are not very widely used, and we don't have $2 coins. So, in the US, you would say:
    "May I get ten singles for this, please?"
    And you would get ten $1 bills in exchange.

    ************************************************** ******
    Quisch,

    Why do you ask for ten singles but given ten $1 bills in exchange? Does singles stand for bills here?
    Is bill more commonly used than banknote? What are their differences?

    Thanks

    In AmE, when referring to currency, a "single" is just another word for a $1 bill. And paper money is almost always referred to as "bills" rather than "bank notes" in the US.

  8. #8
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: exchange of money , greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    ************************************************** *******
    Bobk,

    Shall we simply bid good evening as soon as it gets dark on the day regardless where we are?

    Thanks.
    That's a pretty good rule of thumb. There are parts of the UK, though, where (in late June/early July) it can stay quite light until after 22.00. So I'd add this to your rule: use good evening as soon as it gets dark or at the beginning of the social 'evening' (even if it's still light). By 'social evening' I mean when you go out 'for the evening'.

    b

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