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Thread: grammar check!

  1. #1
    asad hussain is offline Member
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    Default grammar check!

    Please look at the answers for any grammar mistakes, and weird sentences.

    1) What was the poet doing?
    ·He was wandering around.

    2) What did he see?
    ·He saw a field of daffodils.

    3) Where were the daffodils?
    ·They were beside the lake, under the boughs of the trees.

    4) With what does the poet compare the daffodils?
    ·He compares the daffodils with the stars.

    5) Why does the speaker connect daffodils with the stars?
    ·He does so for several reasons. First, their shape. The petals mimic the shape of a star. Second, their number. The stars are infinite; the daffodils are abundant. Third, their color. They're golden, and shimmer like the stars.

    6) What resemblance does he find between the stars and the daffodils?
    ·Their gleam, flow, abundance, and continuity

    7) How many flowers were there?
    ·There was a long belt of about ten thousand flowers.

    8) Which of the two danced more: the waves or the daffodils?
    ·The daffodils.

    9) What did the poet feel looking at the daffodils?
    ·He couldn’t help but feel gay.

    10) How can wealth come to the poet by looking at the scene before him?
    ·The "crowd" of the daffodils comes his way offering warmth, spiritual wealth, richness and value. He realizes the true wealth of the daffodils, when his inner eye recalls back to the time of happiness with them when he felt depressed in his normal state of mind.

    11) What happens to the poet when he lies on his couch?

    ·The thought of the dancing daffodils gives him the same pleasure and excitement that he experienced long ago. Whenever he feels "vacant" or "pensive," the memory flashes upon "that inward eye / That is the bliss of solitude," and his heart fills with pleasure, "and dances with the daffodils."

    12) Mention the two moods of the poet.
    ·Lonely (i.e., as a cloud) and Happy (i.e., gay)


  2. #2
    asad hussain is offline Member
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    Default Re: grammar check!

    13) How can the heart dance?

    Imagining the daffodils vividly enough and with his heart and soul brings your senses and emotions into play, his deep mind doesn't know the difference between that imagined event and an actual one. And his heart starts dancing.

    (Or should I answer it like this?)

    Imagining something vividly enough and with your heart and soul will bring your senses and emotions into play, your deep mind doesn't know the difference between that imagined event and an actual one. And the heart starts dancing.

    “Imaginative rehearsal works for any kind of performance.

    14) Has this ever happened to you?
    ·No, I don’t recall any encounter like this.

    15) In the poem how does Wordsworth achieve the seemingly effortless effect of implying the unity of his consciousness with nature? Does this technique appear in any other Wordsworth lyrics?

    ·Wordsworth employs a kind of identity-switching technique, whereby nature is personified and humanity is, so to speak, nature-ized. Wordsworth describes himself as wandering "like a cloud," and describes the field of daffodils as a dancing crowd of people. This kind of interchangeable terminology implies a unity--metaphors from either realm can be applied to the other, because the mind and the natural world are one. A more subtle version of this technique appears in "Intimations of Immortality," in which the poet describes the natural world in the final stanza with a sequence of ascribed actions and characteristics previously performed and possessed in the poem by human beings. (OK?)

    16) Describe the scene in your own words.

    ·The poet says that, wandering like a cloud floating above hills and valleys, he encountered a field of daffodils beside a lake. The dancing, fluttering flowers stretched endlessly along the shore, and though the waves of the lake danced beside the flowers, the daffodils outdid the water in glee. The poet says that he could not help but be happy in such a joyful company of flowers. He says that he stared and stared, but did not realize what wealth the scene would bring him. For now, whenever he feels "vacant" or "pensive," the memory flashes upon "that inward eye / That is the bliss of solitude," and his heart fills with pleasure, "and dances with the daffodils." (Will the part underlined also come under the description of the scene?)

    17) What is the central idea of the poem? Give it with a very short introduction of the poet and poem.

    ABOUT THE POEM
    "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" is an 1804 poem by William Wordsworth. It was inspired by an April 15, 1802 event in which Wordsworth and his sister, Dorothy came across a "long belt" of daffodils. It was first published in 1807, and a revised version was released in 1815. In anthologies the poem is sometimes titled "The Daffodils".The poem paints a picture of peace and tranquility. Wordsworth uses beautiful imagery to paint this picture (imagery of clouds, walks beneath trees, beside lake, etc.)

    ABOUT THE POET.
    William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770April 23, 1850) was a great English romantic poet. He is known to be "The Poet of Nature" and co-founder of England's Romantic Movement. He loved nature, and learned to appreciate every little thing and to see the beauty in simplicity. His poetry was too much inspired by the beauty of nature. His poems were descriptive and detailed. They used beautiful imagery to evoke emotions, thoughts, and feelings in their readers. He wanted the reader to feel what he felt. (Please look at it for grammar mistakes.)

    CENTRAL IDEA/MAIN THEME
    Simple things in life can enrich our lives how we allow them. We can enjoy natural beauty in two ways: the charm of seeing it and as a memory, and also the feeling in our heart(s) and mind(s).Everything that's ever happened to us lives in us somewhere. The trick is to retrieve what we've perceived. One way to tempt memory into consciousness is to feed it data in a specific, rhythmic, musical way, another is to build bridges to your subliminal mind.
    “A thing of beauty is a joy forever” (John Keats)

  3. #3
    asad hussain is offline Member
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    Default Re: grammar check!

    No help!!!

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: grammar check!

    Not sentences: First, their shape. The petals mimic the shape of a star. Second, their number.

    15 'Like a cloud' is a simile not a metaphor

  5. #5
    asad hussain is offline Member
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    Default Re: grammar check!

    Not sentences: First, their shape. The petals mimic the shape of a star. Second, their number.
    I am really stumped by the question. Could you tell me how I answer it?

    15 'Like a cloud' is a simile not a metaphor.
    You mean it's a mistake? If so, how can I fix it?

  6. #6
    asad hussain is offline Member
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    Default Re: grammar check!

    Is the rest fine?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: grammar check!

    ABOUT THE POET.
    William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850 [unusual - but not ungrammatical - to specify exact dates]) was a great English romantic poet. He is known as "The Poet of Nature" and co-founder of England's Romantic Movement. He loved nature, and learned to appreciate every little thing and to see the beauty in simplicity. His poetry was [too much] inspired by the beauty of nature. His poems were descriptive and detailed. They used beautiful imagery to evoke emotions, thoughts, and feelings in their readers. He wanted the reader to feel what he felt. (Please look at it for grammar mistakes.)
    The Chinese are known to be the inventors of gunpowder. When someone is 'known to be' something, you are saying what everyone believes to be true. But Shakespeare was known as 'the Swan of Avon - it's just an expression that people used.

    Saying 'his poetry is too much inspired...' is making a value judgement - you're saying it's inspired, but more than you think is proper.

    b

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    asad hussain is offline Member
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    Default Re: grammar check!

    Many thanks for your help, Bob. But I am of two minds whether I should say "as" or "to be". What I got from your response is both are OK. Righ

    His poetry is too much inspired by the beauty of nature. Like this? Do I also need to change the next part to the Simple Present Tense, (i.e. His poems are descriptive and detailed. They use beautiful imagery to evoke emotions, thoughts, and feelings in their readers. [not this sentence I guess.] He wanted the reader to feel what he felt.)

  9. #9
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    Default Re: grammar check!

    Quote Originally Posted by asad hussain View Post
    Many thanks for your help, Bob. But I am of two minds whether I should say "as" or "to be". What I got from your response is both are OK. Righ Use 'as'.

    His poetry is [delete: too much] inspired by the beauty of nature. Like this? Do I also need to change the next part to the Simple Present Tense, (i.e. His poems are descriptive and detailed. They use beautiful imagery to evoke emotions, thoughts, and feelings in their readers. [not this sentence I guess.] He wanted the reader to feel what he felt.)
    I thought about the tense. If you use the present simple, you are saying what characterizes his poetry now. If you use the past simple you are talking about the effect his poetry had on the poetical sensibilities of the time - previous poets hadn't used that sort of descriptive and detailed language. Possibly the present is better, unless you say something about the background - for example His poems were descriptive and detailed, unlike those of earlier eighteenth-century poets.

    b

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    Default Re: grammar check!

    Quote Originally Posted by asad hussain View Post
    Please look at the answers for any grammar mistakes, and weird sentences.

    1) What was the poet doing?
    ·He was wandering around.

    2) What did he see?
    ·He saw a field of daffodils.

    3) Where were the daffodils?
    ·They were beside the lake, under the boughs of the trees.

    4) With what does the poet compare the daffodils?
    ·He compares the daffodils with the stars.

    5) Why does the speaker connect daffodils with the stars?
    ·He does so for several reasons. First, their shape. The petals mimic the shape of a star. Second, their number. The stars are infinite; the daffodils are abundant. Third, their color. They're golden, and shimmer like the stars.

    6) What resemblance does he find between the stars and the daffodils?
    ·Their gleam, flow, abundance, and continuity

    7) How many flowers were there?
    ·There was a long belt of about ten thousand flowers.

    8) Which of the two danced more: the waves or the daffodils?
    ·The daffodils.

    9) What did the poet feel looking at the daffodils?
    ·He couldn’t help but feel gay.

    10) How can wealth come to the poet by looking at the scene before him?
    ·The "crowd" of the daffodils comes his way offering warmth, spiritual wealth, richness and value. He realizes the true wealth of the daffodils, when his inner eye recalls back to the time of happiness with them when he felt depressed in his normal state of mind.

    11) What happens to the poet when he lies on his couch?

    ·The thought of the dancing daffodils gives him the same pleasure and excitement that he experienced long ago. Whenever he feels "vacant" or "pensive," the memory flashes upon "that inward eye / That is the bliss of solitude," and his heart fills with pleasure, "and dances with the daffodils."

    12) Mention the two moods of the poet.
    ·Lonely (i.e., as a cloud) and Happy (i.e., gay)
    I would prefer happy to gay because of the association of gay with homosexuality.

    ~R

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