Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    peppy_man is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    296
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile persuade to do / persuade into doing

    (1) I persuaded him to come to the party.
    (2) I persuaded him into coming to the party.

    Is there any difference in meaning between (1) and (2)?
    If both mean the same, which form is more frequently used?

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: persuade to do / persuade into doing

    Quote Originally Posted by peppy_man View Post
    (1) I persuaded him to come to the party.
    (2) I persuaded him into coming to the party.
    Is there any difference in meaning between (1) and (2)?
    If both mean the same, which form is more frequently used?
    The meanings are very close; the 'into + gerund' suggests a more sustained effort at persuading (perhaps over several days):

    He didn't want to come to the party when I first mentioned it, but I finally persuaded him into coming.

    b

  3. #3
    Philly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    620
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: persuade to do / persuade into doing

    Persuade into doing sounds odd to me, though I was able to google it. It sounds as though someone is mixing up "talk into" and "persuade".
    .
    Is that a common usage in the UK, Bob?

  4. #4
    Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Iraq
      • Current Location:
      • Germany
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,198
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: persuade to do / persuade into doing

    Quote Originally Posted by peppy_man View Post
    (1) I persuaded him to come to the party.
    (2) I persuaded him into coming to the party.
    Is there any difference in meaning between (1) and (2)?
    If both mean the same, which form is more frequently used?
    In a way this is the same with try:
    Try to do it: try one time (attempt)
    try doing it: try many times (experiment)

    Thus:
    Persuade into coming to the party (as BobK already said is a sustained effort ie by trying many times or over many days.

    This is because doing sth many times implies experiment and experiment means experience. Experience in turn refers to a retrospective view (gerund) in comparison with infinitive which is prospective in view.
    Last edited by Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim; 31-Jan-2007 at 21:38.

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: persuade to do / persuade into doing

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Persuade into doing sounds odd to me, though I was able to google it. It sounds as though someone is mixing up "talk into" and "persuade".
    .
    Is that a common usage in the UK, Bob?
    I wouldn 't say it was common Philly, but as the learned Doctor says, it exists.

    b

  6. #6
    Philly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    620
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: persuade to do / persuade into doing

    Hi Doc
    .
    To my American ear, the use of a gerund in this case appears to be due to the simple fact that into is a preposition -- just as the gerund would be necessary if we used "talk into".
    .
    I doubt that I have ever used "persuade into" myself. As I mentioned, the usage ("persuade into") sounds odd to me. I guess it must be a regional thing...

  7. #7
    Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Iraq
      • Current Location:
      • Germany
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,198
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: persuade to do / persuade into doing

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Hi Doc
    .
    To my American ear, the use of a gerund in this case appears to be due to the simple fact that into is a preposition -- just as the gerund would be necessary if we used "talk into".
    .
    I doubt that I have ever used "persuade into" myself. As I mentioned, the usage ("persuade into") sounds odd to me. I guess it must be a regional thing...
    You are right the gerund follows a preposition. But into implies a sustained effort as already said. The to in persuade to is part of the infinitive. But you can certainly persuade sb to do sth or into doing sth.

  8. #8
    Philly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    620
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: persuade to do / persuade into doing

    Hi Doc
    .
    I think you may have missed my point. "Persuade into" sounds odd enough to me that it simply sounds wrong and that's probably why it carries none of that "feeling of sustained extra effort" for me. To me, the word persuade (by definition) already indicates some sustained effort.

  9. #9
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    2,585
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: persuade to do / persuade into doing

    1. I persuaded him to come to the party.
    2. I persuaded him into coming to the party.

    I would take "persuade into" in #2 as a phrasal verb, and the underlined portion (the gerund phrase) as its object.

    There seem to be two senses of "persuade (someone) into":

    i) To induce someone into (a belief, etc.).
    ii) To prevail upon someone to do (an action).

    For the latter sense, which appears to be that of #2, my dictionary gives this example:

    3. To persuade the lady into a private marriage (1771).

    MrP

  10. #10
    Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Iraq
      • Current Location:
      • Germany
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,198
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: persuade to do / persuade into doing

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Hi Doc
    .
    I think you may have missed my point. "Persuade into" sounds odd enough to me that it simply sounds wrong and that's probably why it carries none of that "feeling of sustained effort" for me.

    Well Philly it may sound odd to you (AME) but in (BE) it does exist and it is not regional either. As I said earlier the meaning changes to:
    You persuade sb into doing sth by providing good reasons for doing it. Compare the following sentence taken from Oxford English Dictionary:
    I allowed myself to be persuaded into entering the competition

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. convince or persuade?
    By gdiamond in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 27-Jun-2006, 10:55
  2. convince and persuade;example
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-Mar-2005, 07:43

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •