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  1. #1
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    Smile break out of its cocoon

    We watched the butterfly break out of its cocoon.

    Are the words in bold correct? Would it be better to say: We watched the butterfly come out of its cocoon?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: break out of its cocoon

    What about, emerge?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: break out of its cocoon

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    What about, emerge?
    "Emerge" is awesome, but I wonder if break out of sounds right or not in this case.

    Thanks, Casiopea.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: break out of its cocoon

    Hmm. It depends on how the butterfly came out. Have a look at these below and tell me what you think.

    The verb break out has 5 meanings:

    Meaning #1: start abruptly
    Synonym: erupt


    Meaning #2: begin suddenly and sometimes violently


    Meaning #3: move away or escape suddenly
    Synonyms: break, break away


    Meaning #4: take from stowage in preparation for usage


    Meaning #5: become raw or open; as of skin eruptions
    Synonyms: erupt, recrudesce

    Source: Break Out: Information from Answers.com

  5. #5
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    Default Re: break out of its cocoon

    I don't think break out of fits in the base sentence in the light of a butterfly's graceful and tender motion.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: break out of its cocoon

    Ok.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: break out of its cocoon

    Casiopea...'break out' can also mean 'escape from prison'.

    The author in this case used 'break out of its cocoon' to give the image of a butterfly escaping from the prison of its cocoon.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: break out of its cocoon

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Whitehead View Post
    Casiopea...'break out' can also mean 'escape from prison'.

    The author in this case used 'break out of its cocoon' to give the image of a butterfly escaping from the prison of its cocoon.
    Thanks, Andrew, for your reminder. I was aware of the extra meaning before I posted my question.
    Yes, in a sense, it bears the image of a butterfly breaking out of the prison of its cocoon, but it's too strong or powerful a phrase for me.
    Personally, I prefer the milder terms emerge or come out of its cocoon.

  9. #9
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: break out of its cocoon

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Whitehead View Post
    Casiopea...'break out' can also mean 'escape from prison'.
    The author in this case used 'break out of its cocoon' to give the image of a butterfly escaping from the prison of its cocoon.
    I agree with Andrew.

    Besides, the cocoon is quite strong and it does take a violent effort to break out. Have you ever seen this process piousoul? After the effort of breaking out, the butterfly has to rest and soak up the sun's rays for quite a while.

    'Emerge from' is OK, but I see nothing inaccurate or incongruous with 'break out of'.

    b

  10. #10
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    Default Re: break out of its cocoon

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I agree with Andrew.

    Besides, the cocoon is quite strong and it does take a violent effort to break out. Have you ever seen this process piousoul? After the effort of breaking out, the butterfly has to rest and soak up the sun's rays for quite a while.

    'Emerge from' is OK, but I see nothing inaccurate or incongruous with 'break out of'.b
    Thanks, Bob, for the comment, and I'm getting more and more convinced that break out of fits perfectly well in this case.

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