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  1. #1
    Falcon is offline Member
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    Arrow FILLED x STUFFED (about food)

    Hello,

    Can anybody tell me what's difference between filled and stuffed? (I mean regarding to food).

    When do I have to use "filled" or "stuffed"? Is there any difference?

    thanks,

    Falcon

  2. #2
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: FILLED x STUFFED (about food)

    As far as I can determine, there is not a huge difference between the two terms. As a very general rule, "stuffed" refers to a non-dessert food items. A turkey can be stuffed with dressing, cannelloni noodles stuffed with ground sausage, mushroom caps stuffed with crabmeat, etc. "Filled" usually describes a dessert item, such as a cream-filled pastry, or a pie with custard filling.

  3. #3
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: FILLED x STUFFED (about food)

    I presume you are talking about food preparation?

    Anything with a shell made of pastry will be filled with something.

    Meat and fish can be stuffed - have another foodstuff inserted into the body cavities. Vegetables can also be stuffed, once the seeds are removed from the interior of the vegetable.

  4. #4
    Falcon is offline Member
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    Arrow Re: FILLED x STUFFED (about food)

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    As far as I can determine, there is not a huge difference between the two terms. As a very general rule, "stuffed" refers to a non-dessert food items. A turkey can be stuffed with dressing, cannelloni noodles stuffed with ground sausage, mushroom caps stuffed with crabmeat, etc. "Filled" usually describes a dessert item, such as a cream-filled pastry, or a pie with custard filling.
    Huuummm... I think I understood...
    If I'm cooking a pie, for example, I can say I'm filling with minced meat and vegetables... isn't?

  5. #5
    Falcon is offline Member
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    Arrow Re: FILLED x STUFFED (about food)

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    I presume you are talking about food preparation?

    Anything with a shell made of pastry will be filled with something.

    Meat and fish can be stuffed - have another foodstuff inserted into the body cavities. Vegetables can also be stuffed, once the seeds are removed from the interior of the vegetable.
    That's it. I'm talking about food preparation.
    Now, I think I got it!! For example, I can say I cooked a croissant filled with (minced or other word?)chicken, right?
    Last edited by Falcon; 14-Feb-2007 at 21:56. Reason: I made a mistake; rather "chicken" I wrote "chiken".

  6. #6
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: FILLED x STUFFED (about food)

    Hello Falcon

    You could fill a croissant with cheese; you could fill a sandwich with beef and onion; you could fill a pie with chicken and ham.

    (Thus sandwiches and pies have "fillings".)

    On the other hand, you could "stuff" a squash or a pepper or a very large mushroom with a mixture of pinenuts and basil and mozzarella; or you could stuff a chicken with onion, herbs, etc.

    As has been said, "stuff" implies a cavity of some kind and a certain forcefulness: the "stuffing" is crammed into the cavity.

    All the best,

    MrP

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: FILLED x STUFFED (about food)

    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon View Post
    That's it. I'm talking about food preparation.
    ...
    Aha. So you won't want to know (but might find it interesting) that the same (or related) words can be used after eating: 'I'm full' [not 'filled'] or (informally) 'I'm stuffed [full]'.

    b

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    Default Re: FILLED x STUFFED (about food)

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Aha. So you won't want to know (but might find it interesting) that the same (or related) words can be used after eating: 'I'm full' [not 'filled'] or (informally) 'I'm stuffed [full]'.
    Aha! I was thinking the very same. About usage, is I'm stuffed considered informal in your part of the UK? The reason I ask, it is in Canada; you wouldn't say it at a formal dinner. It's the same in Japan as well; i.e., onaka ga ippai (I'm full), pampam (I'm stuffed). The latter is reserved for friends and (some) family.

  9. #9
    Falcon is offline Member
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    Arrow Re: FILLED x STUFFED (about food)

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post
    Hello Falcon

    You could fill a croissant with cheese; you could fill a sandwich with beef and onion; you could fill a pie with chicken and ham.

    (Thus sandwiches and pies have "fillings".)

    On the other hand, you could "stuff" a squash or a pepper or a very large mushroom with a mixture of pinenuts and basil and mozzarella; or you could stuff a chicken with onion, herbs, etc.

    As has been said, "stuff" implies a cavity of some kind and a certain forcefulness: the "stuffing" is crammed into the cavity.

    All the best,

    MrP

    Yep, Mrp! Now I really got it! Thanks.

  10. #10
    Falcon is offline Member
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    Arrow Re: FILLED x STUFFED (about food)

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Aha. So you won't want to know (but might find it interesting) that the same (or related) words can be used after eating: 'I'm full' [not 'filled'] or (informally) 'I'm stuffed [full]'.

    b
    Of course I want to know it as well! It's always welcome any new word, or meanings, idioms or slang! I've already heard about "I'm full" but it's the first time I had heard "I'm stuffed". It's nice to learn new 'informal' using of words and meanings.

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