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Thread: "In a bid"

  1. #11
    winston is offline Member
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    Default Re: "In a bid"

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    In order to and in a bid are different. They can co-occur (e.g., He said, "I doubt that the IRL would put in a bid in order to continue the series.). Moreover, in its semantics in a bid houses the meaning, strategy. It's about obtaining control of something, as in this sense of the word play here: a bid (e.g., a play for sympathy).
    Thank you very much.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: "In a bid"

    Quote Originally Posted by winston View Post
    Thank you very much.
    Wait, winston. I've given you the wrong example. In the one I gave 'put in a bid' means something else.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: "In a bid"

    You may be right, winston. "in a bid" and "in order to" don't seem to co-occur. However, their semantics do in fact differ. Here's a better example for you. To me 'in a bid' means an attempt, and that attempt is a strategic move.

    Ex: Hillary Clinton turns to Chelsea in a bid to soften her image. Source

    All the best.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: "In a bid"

    'In a bid' =in an effort

    Why don't you give us the whole sentence?

  5. #15
    winston is offline Member
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    Default Re: "In a bid"

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    You may be right, winston. "in a bid" and "in order to" don't seem to co-occur. However, their semantics do in fact differ. Here's a better example for you. To me 'in a bid' means an attempt, and that attempt is a strategic move.

    Ex: Hillary Clinton turns to Chelsea in a bid to soften her image. Source

    All the best.
    Then just like I said we can put "in order to" instead of "in a bid".
    I can see this "In a bid" in many articles in daily news paper.

  6. #16
    winston is offline Member
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    Default Re: "In a bid"

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    'In a bid' =in an effort

    Why don't you give us the whole sentence?
    Queen,almost I got it.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: "In a bid"

    Thank you very much.(Winston)
    Wait, winston. I've given you the wrong example. In the one I gave 'put in a bid' means something else.(Casiopea)

    hehehe The only time winston was satisfied was when casiopea gave the wrong example. I'll never understand men!

  8. #18
    winston is offline Member
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    Default Re: "In a bid"

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    Thank you very much.(Winston)
    Wait, winston. I've given you the wrong example. In the one I gave 'put in a bid' means something else.(Casiopea)

    hehehe The only time winston was satisfied was when casiopea gave the wrong example. I'll never understand men!
    Hello Queen,
    I think you were waiting for this movement.See, if I know everythig perfectly why I should ask teacher.When I am unaware about one thing,I should beleive whatever teacher says.Isn't it?Even if teacher says milk is black,I must believe.Because I am unaware about milk. I am really satisfied, because you have got a chance to be happy.
    You have really done very good job in this thread.ok.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: "In a bid"

    Quote Originally Posted by winston View Post
    When I am unaware about one thing, I should beleive whatever teacher says. Isn't it?
    winston, you should ask, ask, and ask again, until whatever it is you're looking to understand makes sense to you.

    All the best.

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