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Thread: Pish

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Pish

    In fact I think the Maltese word 'jaqq' comes from the word 'yuck'. Note that the 'j' in Maltese has the sound of 'y' and 'q' is guttural.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Pish

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    You might say 'yuck' (often written 'ugh' - which signifies the [x] sound at the end); a childish form of this is 'icky'. Or the mother might just say 'Dirty'.

    b
    Then there is no relation with the word "Pish".
    But I think there is something in between the expression and the word "Pish".Please reconsider.

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    Default Re: Pish

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    In fact I think the Maltese word 'jaqq' comes from the word 'yuck'. Note that the 'j' in Maltese has the sound of 'y' and 'q' is guttural.
    Yuck is ok.But I think something is related to the word "Pish"
    please review once more.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Pish

    "Pish tosh" (not "tush," which is indeed slang for the backside) is a very formal, stuffy, almost Edwardian way of saying "Nonsense!" or "No way!"


    I don't know if you're familiar with the TV show Frasier, but Frasier Crane and his brother Niles were somewhat affected and grandiose - they always wore designer clothes, drank the finest wines, and attended the opera regularly. Of course, they didn't see themselves as anything but "regular." One day their father tried to explain to them that they were often a bit pretentious. "Pish tosh!" and "Poppycock!" were their replies, which only proved their dad's point.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Pish

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    ... (not "tush," which is indeed slang for the backside) ...
    Not in BE; it rhymes with gush, hush, lush, and rush, and not with bush, push etc.

    b

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    winston is offline Member
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    Default Re: Pish

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    You might say 'yuck' (often written 'ugh' - which signifies the [x] sound at the end); a childish form of this is 'icky'. Or the mother might just say 'Dirty'.

    b
    "yuck" is an exclamatery expression.Isn't it?In some time it comes as a noun in some sentences.
    For example:
    High school girls say lovey-dovey relationships give them the "yucks".
    what is the meaning of this sentence?
    what is lovey -dovey relationship?

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Pish

    Quote Originally Posted by winston View Post
    "yuck" is an exclamatery expression.Isn't it?In some time it comes as a noun in some sentences.
    For example:
    High school girls say lovey-dovey relationships give them the "yucks".
    what is the meaning of this sentence?
    what is lovey -dovey relationship?
    I haven't met 'the yucks' before (you're right - 'yuck' is exclamatory), but it's clear from that context that it means a strong feeling of disgust.

    Lovey-dovey is an informal adjective used to describe something that is excessively or childishly affectionate.

    b

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    Default Re: Pish

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I haven't met 'the yucks' before (you're right - 'yuck' is exclamatory), but it's clear from that context that it means a strong feeling of disgust.

    Lovey-dovey is an informal adjective used to describe something that is excessively or childishly affectionate.

    b
    Then what is your(native speaker's) expression instead of "Yuck!".

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Pish

    Quote Originally Posted by winston View Post
    Then what is your(native speaker's) expression instead of "Yuck!".
    Most people don't say anything - they just 'pull a face' (grimace) - and maybe add a one word comment, as appropriate: nasty or scary or filthy.... I can't imagine what word you're looking for. Sorry.

    b

    PS
    Going back to one of your earlier posts, I see you said when we disgust something. The verb disgust doesn't work like that in English. You should say 'when something disgusts us' or 'when we are disgusted by something'.
    Last edited by BobK; 19-Feb-2007 at 13:44. Reason: Misspelt "you're" - aargh

  10. #20
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    Default Re: Pish

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Most people don't say anything - they just 'pull a face' (grimace) - and maybe add a one word comment, as appropriate: nasty or scary or filthy.... I can't imagine what word your looking for. Sorry.

    b

    PS
    Going back to one of your earlier posts, I see you said when we disgust something. The verb disgust doesn't work like that in English. You should say 'when something disgusts us' or 'when we are disgusted by something'.
    Thank you very much for your correction.
    I have got something.I think "enough"
    thank you once again.

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