Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23
  1. #11
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    "Baloney" is one of those words a person might use if he thinks something is BS. It's an expression of disapproval. A similar expression is, "What a crock!"

    :wink:

  2. #12
    Taka is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,074
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    "Baloney" is one of those words a person might use if he thinks something is BS. It's an expression of disapproval. A similar expression is, "What a crock!"
    To RonBee

    So, do you think "baloney" is almost equivalent to "bullshit" (did you mean this word by "BS"??) even though the word "baloney" is altered from "BS"?

  3. #13
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    "Baloney" is one of those words a person might use if he thinks something is BS. It's an expression of disapproval. A similar expression is, "What a crock!"
    To RonBee

    So, do you think "baloney" is almost equivalent to "bullshit" (did you mean this word by "BS"??) even though the word "baloney" is altered from "BS"?
    Yes. BS is short for bullshit. Baloney is a milder form of that word.

    :)

  4. #14
    Taka is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,074
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Yes. BS is short for bullshit. Baloney is a milder form of that word.
    Milder, but not to be used in front of the grandmother in the story?

    Do you think tdol's interpretation is correct and mine is impossible, far from the author's intention?

  5. #15
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Yes. BS is short for bullshit. Baloney is a milder form of that word.
    Milder, but not to be used in front of the grandmother in the story?

    Do you think tdol's interpretation is correct and mine is impossible, far from the autor's intention?
    It is hard for me to tell if he thinks grandma might have been offended by that word or if he thinks the reader might have been offended by the word he actually used. It seems to me that he might have said, "Grandma, I do nice things for people and all I get back is crap."

    When he says "I didnít use that word" that indicates to me that perhaps a somewhat coarser word was used. "Baloney" is pretty mild compared to some things.

    :)

  6. #16
    Taka is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,074
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you very much RonBee!!

  7. #17
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,116
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    "Baloney" is pretty mild compared to some things.

    :)
    It isn't used much in Tarantino films.

  8. #18
    Taka is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,074
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It isn't used much in Tarantino films.
    Ha-ha! That's right!!

  9. #19
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    3,386
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    You're welcome. Interesting 'bullshit' in British English is less vulgar than 'shit'.
    I would guess that's because it's disassociated from humans. :?
    Red5
    Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com

  10. #20
    Hong Kong Chinese Guest

    Default Bugger

    Well, I’ll Be…
    A Rogue Scamp
    Britain’s Advertising Standards Authority rejected a complaint about an ad insert in the educational supplement of The Times which referred to children as little ‘buggers’. As in: “Don’t Let the Buggers Get You Down”. It listed teaching guides produced by the London-based publisher Continuum, including: Getting the Buggers to Write; Getting the Buggers to Draw: Getting the Buggers to Think; Getting the Buggers into Languages; and Getting the Buggers to Add Up. The advertisers said the word was inoffensive when applied to a child, when it had the same meaning as ‘rogue scamp.”. -Sky News
    Teachers and Experts from US and UK, please comment on! I sometimes heard my ex late boss, an English called his Chinese partner ‘bugger’. Did he really mean ‘chap’ or ‘fellow’?

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Sounds incorrect but, would someone tell me why please?
    By AleynDLester in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29-Aug-2004, 18:35
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Jul-2004, 09:21
  3. sounds like a date to me
    By zeppy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14-Dec-2003, 20:19
  4. Sounds
    By RonBee in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 24-Nov-2003, 18:53
  5. vowel sounds
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 31-Aug-2003, 11:29

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •