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Thread: sentence

  1. #21
    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Re: sentence

    :up Makes sense to me.

    b

  2. #22
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    Default Re: sentence

    Just to clarify my test says bases and NOT basis

  3. #23
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    Default Re: sentence

    Just to clarify my test says bases and NOT basis
    Right!

    So, for me there wasn't the slightest doubt about the right answer being "grounds"

    People just got confused along the road

  4. #24
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    Default Re: sentence

    Anything for a discussion, Miner! I still have to chew over all that they told me. I've been so busy with Maths lessons!

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    Default Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    :up Makes sense to me.
    b
    Unfortunately, being a teacher I make a very bad student! I still have to think it over till I'm really convinced.

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    Default Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Oh...now there's something worth looking into. Advanced learners are given one set of definitions, whereas Learners are given another set. A different set.

    Anyway, here's a take that might satisfy everyone. Hopefully. Watch this,

    3 REASON the reason for something
    [1] There is no legal basis for his claim.
    Test it: There is no legal reason for his claim.

    'basis for' and 'reason for' are synonymous there, but not here,

    [2] Marks are rewarded on the basis of progress.
    Test it: Marks are rewarded on the reasons of progress.

    On the basis of and basis for are different in structure, so their sematics will be different as well. On the basis of expresses a foundation for something; Something develops, as in extends from or out of that basis. It's not a reason for something; basis for is. Therefore, 'on the grounds of failing health' works because of the little 'ol preposition 'on'.

    What do you think?
    So would it be okay to say 'Failing health is the basis(reason) for the sentence having been (or 'being') commuted'?

  7. #27
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    Default Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by cleopenelope View Post
    Just to clarify my test says bases and NOT basis
    Yes, I realized that. But bases was seriously and totally wrong, and basis was just slightly wrong, so - not having much faith in examiners - I assumed they'd got it wrong. Also, the plural of base is /'beısız/, whereas the plural of basis is /'beısi:z/ (both spelt 'bases'), which allowed me to suspect there might be some confusion somewhere. Sorry if I started a wild goose chase.

    b

  8. #28
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    Default Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    So would it be okay to say 'Failing health is the basis (reason) for the sentence having been (or 'being') commuted'?
    Look at it this way: reason and basis are synonyms in that both pertain to what underlies or supports. A reason can be described as a basis or motive for an action; however, a basis isn't a "justifiable" reason. It's the fundamental assumption(s) underlying an explanation. Failing health is neither a fundamental principle nor an underlying concept.

    Yet another dictionary:
    SYNONYMS basis, ground. These nouns pertain to what underlies and supports.

    Basis is used in a nonphysical sense:“Healthy scepticism is the basis of all accurate observation” (Arthur Conan Doyle).

    Ground is used figuratively in the plural to mean a justifiable reason: grounds for divorce.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    So would it be okay to say 'Failing health is the basis(reason) for the sentence having been (or 'being') commuted'?
    (Sorry - I missed this last night.)

    b
    PS
    on reflection - see later post
    Last edited by BobK; 20-Feb-2007 at 14:54. Reason: PS added

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    Default Re: sentence

    Originally Posted by queenbu
    So would it be okay to say 'Failing health is the basis(reason) for the sentence having been (or 'being') commuted'?
    Is it according to BobK but according to Casiopea?
    One last attempt:
    I would say, 'On what grounds are you filing for divorce?' but 'On what basis have you made your judgement?'
    What do you both say?

    Thank you so much for your patience.

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