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Thread: clause

  1. Anonymous
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    #1

    clause

    1-I received a phone call from my mother in London.
    2-I received a phone call from my mother, in London.
    Whos is in London? Does the comma change anything?
    (This is the kind of question I ask very often, I know.)

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    #2
    There is a possibility of amibiguity in 2, but it's rather far-fetched. With this example, I would suggest that the comma doesn't change anything unless the speaker has more than one mother.

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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    There is a possibility of amibiguity in 2, but it's rather far-fetched. With this example, I would suggest that the comma doesn't change anything unless the speaker has more than one mother.
    Agreed.

    ...my mother, (the one) in London.

    :)


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    #4

    Re: clause

    Quote Originally Posted by navi
    1-I received a phone call from my mother in London.
    2-I received a phone call from my mother, in London.
    That's very strange...

    As a not English native, I see there 2 different meanings :
    1. In the first sentence : my mother is in London.
    2. In the second sentence : I am in London.
    Could it be possible ?

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #5
    In the second sentence it is at least possible that the speaker is in London.

    :)

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: clause

    Quote Originally Posted by navi
    1-I received a phone call from my mother in London.
    2-I received a phone call from my mother, in London.
    Whos is in London? Does the comma change anything?
    (This is the kind of question I ask very often, I know.)
    It is a confusing sentence. The best way to end the confusion is to rephrase the sentence.

    I received a phone call from my mother when I was in London.
    I received a phone call from my mother when she was in London.
    I received a phone call from my mother, who lives in London.

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