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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb to do a take-off on someone.

    (1) She had to quit the show after she refused to do a take-off on a colleague. What does " to do a take-off on someone" mean in the above sentence. (2) All those not belonging to the national (ie. Hindu) race, religion, culture and language naturally fall out of the pale of real 'nationasl" life. What does "fall out of the pale" (not pail=bucket) mean.

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
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    Re: to do a take-off on someone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Romel Panzer View Post
    (1) She had to quit the show after she refused to do a take-off on a colleague. What does " to do a take-off on someone" mean in the above sentence. (2) All those not belonging to the national (ie. Hindu) race, religion, culture and language naturally fall out of the pale of real 'nationasl" life. What does "fall out of the pale" (not pail=bucket) mean.

    I've never met 'do a take-off on'. To 'do a take-off of someone' (British English, informal), or to 'take somebody off' is to impersonate them (as a performance - perhaps with the intention of ridiculing them - rather than as an attempted fraud - with the intention of criminal profit [which would be 'commit identity theft']).

    a pale is a perimeter fence; hence 'beyond the pale'.

    b

  3. #3
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    Re: to do a take-off on someone.

    In AmE, to do a take-off on someone or something is to parody it or make fun of it. It usually means you imitate the person, but in doing so exaggerate his or her foibles and mannerisms in a humorous (to others, anyway) fashion.

    For example, the film Airplane! was a take-off on Airport and the other famous disaster movies of the early 1970s.

  4. #4
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    Re: to do a take-off on someone.

    Bob is right: it's take-of OF, not take-of ON.

    The term 'beyond the pale' relates to a Czarist restriction on where Jews might physically live, but I'm not sure there was actually a fence.

  5. #5
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    Re: to do a take-off on someone.

    Quote Originally Posted by mark in perth View Post
    Bob is right: it's take-of OF, not take-of ON.

    The term 'beyond the pale' relates to a Czarist restriction on where Jews might physically live, but I'm not sure there was actually a fence.
    I think the on comes from these damn Yankees!

    I'd be surprised if there wasn't a fence - the word's related to 'palisade'.

    b PS Right - Online Etymology Dictionary - though as the figurative sense of 'boundary' is dated at 1400, the Czarists may well have used it that way.

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