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    #1

    Question "in" means "after"?

    I will come in ten days.



    Some people say ,"in ten days"means "after the tenth day"in this case.


    Is it true?I can not grasp this.


    I need help.

  1. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "in" means "after"?

    Quote Originally Posted by freddie View Post
    I will come in ten days.



    Some people say ,"in ten days"means "after the tenth day"in this case.


    Is it true?I can not grasp this.


    I need help.
    Yes, they are right.


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    #3

    Re: "in" means "after"?

    Hi Freddie

    Saying "I will come in ten days." is not quite as clear as stating a specific date.

    However, if today is the 1st day of the month, then saying "I will come in ten days" would usually be understood as "I will come on the 11th."

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    #4

    Re: "in" means "after"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Hi Freddie

    Saying "I will come in ten days." is not quite as clear as stating a specific date.

    However, if today is the 1st day of the month, then saying "I will come in ten days" would usually be understood as "I will come on the 11th."
    I think there is no need to state a specific date. When someone says "I'll be back in ten days" the starting point is automatically considered to be the specific date.


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    #5

    Re: "in" means "after"?

    Let's say someone leaves on a business trip at 6:00 a.m. on the first of the month and the scheduled return is 9 p.m. on the 10th of the month. It's entirely possible that this person might say "I'll be back in 10 days". Whether you think it's right or wrong for the person to say that is irrelevant. The fact remains that it is always clearest to state a date of arrival or return.


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    #6

    Re: "in" means "after"?

    Quote Originally Posted by freddie View Post
    I will come in ten days.
    Some people say ,"in ten days"means "after the tenth day"in this case.
    Is it true?I can not grasp this.
    I need help.
    used to indicate inclusion within or occurrence during a period or limit of time

  3. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "in" means "after"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Let's say someone leaves on a business trip at 6:00 a.m. on the first of the month and the scheduled return is 9 p.m. on the 10th of the month. It's entirely possible that this person might say "I'll be back in 10 days". Whether you think it's right or wrong for the person to say that is irrelevant. The fact remains that it is always clearest to state a date of arrival or return.
    Let's not count the hours and the minutes. Let's speak English. It's even possible to say" I'll be back in 10 days or so."

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    #8

    Wink Re: "in" means "after"?

    Mrs or Mrs and Mses ,I have looked through all your views above,but I am still unclear abut why it is such a case.




    I do not find a sense of "in" that it means "after" in several dictionaries.

    In dictionaries,it is only explained as "within or during a period".



    What I want is just a logic and reasonable explanation about relation between
    "in" and "after".


    I really cannot connect them up at all.


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    #9

    Re: "in" means "after"?

    Quote Originally Posted by freddie View Post
    Mrs or Mrs and Mses ,I have looked through all your views above,but I am still unclear abut why it is such a case.




    I do not find a sense of "in" that it means "after" in several dictionaries.

    In dictionaries,it is only explained as "within or during a period".



    What I want is just a logic and reasonable explanation about relation between
    "in" and "after".


    I really cannot connect them up at all.

    Yes, when you say "in ten days" you mean "after ten days" or "within ten days" or "during ten days'. They have similar meaning.

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    #10

    Re: "in" means "after"?

    if I want to mean: I will come back on any day of that ten days,

    can I say"I will come back in ten days"?


    If not,why?

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