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  1. Anonymous
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    #1

    Searching for a word

    If a person, whose mother tongue is not English, learn to use and speak English as perfect as a native, what would be the most suitable adjective to describe this person's English ability?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Searching for a word

    Quote Originally Posted by Tombraider
    If a person, whose mother tongue is not English, learn to use and speak English as perfect as a native, what would be the most suitable adjective to describe this person's English ability?

    Thanks in advance.
    The word "fluent" would be a good one.

    flu·ent (flū'ənt)
    adj.

    1. Able to express oneself readily and effortlessly: a fluent speaker; fluent in three languages.
    2. Flowing effortlessly; polished: speaks fluent Russian; gave a fluent performance of the sonata.
    3. Flowing or moving smoothly; graceful: a yacht with long, fluent curves.
    4. Flowing or capable of flowing; fluid.
    [Latin fluēns, fluent-, present participle of fluere, to flow.]

    flu'en·cy n.
    flu'ent·ly adv.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


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  3. Tombraiders
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    #3
    Thanks, MikeNewYork. But I am afraid fluent is not the one. The reason is fluent tells only how skillful and effortlessly. You can speak fluent English, you may have accent; you may be able to use English fluently, but that might be British style English rather than American English. So I am thinking of some words like "He speaks native, authentic or indigenous English", or maybe something else. I need a word that describes if you speak with a foreigner without seeing him, it's impossible to tell he is from another country.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Tombraiders
    Thanks, MikeNewYork. But I am afraid fluent is not the one. The reason is fluent tells only how skillful and effortlessly. You can speak fluent English, you may have accent; you may be able to use English fluently, but that might be British style English rather than American English. So I am thinking of some words like "He speaks native, authentic or indigenous English", or maybe something else. I need a word that describes if you speak with a foreigner without seeing him, it's impossible to tell he is from another country.
    I'm not sure there is a single word for that. One could say, "He speaks like a native speaker", "He speaks like he was raised here", etc.

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Tombraiders
    Thanks, MikeNewYork. But I am afraid fluent is not the one. The reason is fluent tells only how skillful and effortlessly. You can speak fluent English, you may have accent; you may be able to use English fluently, but that might be British style English rather than American English. So I am thinking of some words like "He speaks native, authentic or indigenous English", or maybe something else. I need a word that describes if you speak with a foreigner without seeing him, it's impossible to tell he is from another country.
    I agree with Mike in that there's really isn't one word. In addition to Mike's, there's S/he sounds just like a native speaker. Also, I agree with you in saying that 'fluent' just doesn't cut it. Given the definition of 'fluent', with regards to language acquisition, there are speakers of X, Y, and Z languages all over the World who are not yet fluent in their own language. :)

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    I agree with Mike in that there's really isn't one word. In addition to Mike's, there's S/he sounds just like a native speaker. Also, I agree with you in saying that 'fluent' just doesn't cut it. Given the definition of 'fluent', with regards to language acquisition, there are speakers of X, Y, and Z languages all over the World who are not yet fluent in their own language. :)
    Ain't that the truth!

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