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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Modern English vs Old Style English

    I can only venture to suggest that some people might have been brought up on the Mainland at the time of the cultural revolution or there around, when newspapers were a scarcity and people were used to reading the People's Daily and whatever local papers posted on billboards outside community halls, train stations, public parks and what not. By force of habit, they have grown to enjoy peering over the shoulders of others for a scrap of free information without even aware what nuisance they are causing to their victims.
    By force of habit =From habit
    what not?



    -- This is classic. If you happened to be interested by a news story and couldn't help yourself from a sideward glance, that's excusable. But make it a point of reading other people's paper and brazen enough not only to call names when they show the least sign of being annoyed but further brag here on the thought that your OLO colleagues are all a petty group to echo?! Have some self-esteem, man.
    This is classic = This is typical or what?
    call names = scold?
    brag on - shouldn't be brag about?

    a petty group = tiny group or else?
    man - salutation by the black people - Hey Man
    to echo = resonate?

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Modern English vs Old Style English

    Quote Originally Posted by confused
    This is classic. If you happened to be interested by a news story and couldn't help yourself from a sideward glance, that's excusable. But make it a point of reading other people's paper and brazen enough not only to call names when they show the least sign of being annoyed but further brag here on the thought that your OLO colleagues are all a petty group to echo?! Have some self-esteem, man.
    This is classic = This is typical or what? This is great
    call names = scold? insult
    brag on - shouldn't be brag about? It is, but 'on' goes with 'the thought'

    a petty group = tiny group or else? petty = small and unimportant
    man - salutation by the black people - Hey Man used by people of many ethnic groups now- Blacks in the UK use 'bruv' (brother) and 'blood' alot nowadays
    to echo = resonate? imitate by repeating (I think)

  3. #3
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default

    These are the definitions of classic that apply to the cited example.

    classic
    4 a : AUTHENTIC, AUTHORITATIVE b : TYPICAL <a classic example of chicanery>
    http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionar...amp;va=classic

    2. definitive: authoritative and perfect as a standard of its kind
    a classic example of mixed metaphor English
    http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/featur...fid=1861597645

    adjective
    1 having all the characteristics or qualities that you expect:
    He's a classic example of a kid who's clever but lazy.
    He had all the classic symptoms of the disease.

    2 INFORMAL DISAPPROVING bad or unpleasant, but not particularly surprising or unexpected:
    It's classic - you arrive at the station on time and find that the train's left early.
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...&amp;dict=CALD

    (2)b. Of a well-known type; typical: a classic mistake.
    http://www.bartleby.com/61/99/C0389900.html

    9. traditional or typical: a classic comedy routine.
    http://www.infoplease.com/ipd/A0375322.html

    adj.
    2.
    a. Adhering or conforming to established standards and principles: a classic piece of research.
    b. Of a well-known type; typical: a classic mistake.

    n.
    4. A typical or traditional example.
    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=classic

    :)

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