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    #1

    Which is grammatically acceptable ?

    Dear Sir/Ma'am,
    Would you kindly let me know which sentence is grammatically acceptable
    between the two sentences ?
    1.
    Fall is the best season to read.
    Fall is the best season to read in.
    2.
    He has no reason to resign.
    He has no reason to resign for.
    3.
    Here is a good place to take a taxi
    Here is a good place to take a taxi at.

    With regard to the question No.1
    I think as follows:

    Fall is the best season in which we can read.
    = Fall is the best season in which to read.
    = Fall is the best season which to read in.
    = Fall is the best season to read in.

    However, I can find the sentence without "in" in the books & magazines. Can it be used with and without "in" ?

    I look forward to receiving your answer.
    Last edited by sariputra; 04-Mar-2007 at 08:11.

  1. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Which is grammatically acceptable ?

    .
    All your sentences would be crisper without the preposition.
    .


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    #3

    Re: Which is grammatically acceptable ?

    Thank you, Mr.Micawber, for your answer.

    In this regard, I would appreciate it if you further let me know whether the following sentences with the prepositions are also acceptable.

    1.Fall is the best season to read in.

    2.He has no reason to resign for.

    3.Here is a good place to take a taxi at.

  2. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Which is grammatically acceptable ?

    .
    They all sound substandard to me, Sariputra.
    .

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    #5

    Re: Which is grammatically acceptable ?

    Quote Originally Posted by sariputra View Post
    Thank you, Mr.Micawber, for your answer.
    In this regard, I would appreciate it if you further let me know whether the following sentences with the prepositions are also acceptable.
    1.Fall is the best season to read in.
    2.He has no reason to resign for.
    3.Here is a good place to take a taxi at.
    But it's important to point out that while some people regard 1 and 3 as substandard, they are quite common - and regarded by many as acceptable. 2, on the other hand is plain wrong.

    He has no reason to resign,
    He has no reason for resigning.
    He has no reason to resign for.

    b


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    #6

    Re: Which is grammatically acceptable ?

    "Substandard" sounds a little prescriptivist to me Perhaps, informal or formal? Anyway, BobK, your reply re: #2 is dead on, but I would also add that #3 with "at" is not grammatically correct.

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    #7

    Re: Which is grammatically acceptable ?

    .
    "Substandard" sounds a little prescriptivist to me. Perhaps, informal or formal?
    Not really. Fiona. Prescriptivism is in the prescription-- as in 'That sentence is informal' (vs 'It sounds informal to me'). Everyone is entitled to her opinion; it is the legislating that is prescriptivist.

    As Huddleston & Pullum (CGEL) put it, 'When it comes to points of grammar, the only legimate basis for an absolute judgement of incorrectness in a usage manual is that what is being rejected is not in the standard language' [italics theirs]-- and quite prescriptivistic that [italics mine] statement is, eh?
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    #8

    Re: Which is grammatically acceptable ?

    Dear Sir/Ma'am
    I am still confused when it comes to "Noun + to infinitive + without/with a preposition".
    In this regard, please let me know which sentence is acceptable between the two sentences below.
    It had cabins for passengers to sleep in and a dining room. ------ (1)
    It had cabins for passengers to sleep and a dining room.--------- (2)
    If possible, please let me have a yardstick with which I can judge whether the prepositon is needed or not.
    Thank you in advance.

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    #9

    Re: Which is grammatically acceptable ?

    .
    Offhand, it seems to be case-by-case as to how acceptable/redundant/required the preposition is, Sariputra.

    In your latest effort, it seems to me that 'sleep in' is certainly acceptable and almost required.

    I have a feeling that it has to do with the function of the prepositional phrase-- those which are general adverbials seem to retain the preposition quite readily: 'sleep in cabins', 'read in the fall', 'catch a taxi at this place'.

    This is an unsubstantiated observation, I hasten to add.
    .


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    #10

    Re: Which is grammatically acceptable ?

    Thank you, Mr. Macawber, for your kind & elaborate reply.

    From the viewpoint of a student who has been studying English in EFL atmosphere,all of the prepositions that have been referred to so far are required to use.

    For example,

    As I am busy, I have little time for reading.
    = As I am busy, I have little time in which I can read.
    = As I am busy, I have little time which I can read in.
    = As I am busy, I have little time I can read in.
    = As I am busy, I have little time to read in.

    You have no reason why you should resign.
    = You have no reason for which you should resign.
    = You have no reason which you should resign for.
    = You have no reason you should resign for.
    = You have no reason to resign for.

    It seems to me,however, that the prepositions are now generally omitted by native speakers by the economic reason in case that the preceding nouns are time, reason, way, place, etc. which are very often used in adverbial phrases. And the prepositions that are used in infinitival phrases in order to modify the said nouns now seem to be regarded as redundant to the native speakers of English.

    As English grammar may well be made by you, native speakers, I will learn and follow the rules.

    Thank you again, Mr. Micawber.
    Last edited by sariputra; 07-Mar-2007 at 05:04.

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